False Cross

False Cross,

in astronomy: see CarinaCarina
[Lat.,=the keel], southern constellation, representing the keel of the ancient constellation Argo Navis, or Ship of the Argonauts. Carina contains Canopus, the second brightest star in the sky.
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False Cross

A cross-shaped group of four 2nd-magnitude stars in the former constellation Argo. The group is now divided between Carina (Iota [ι] and Epsilon [Ɛ]) and Vela (Kappa [κ] and Delta [δ]).
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
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References in periodicals archive ?
It spans from the False Cross in the south- west, up through Crux and Centaurus, to the curved figure of Scorpius the Scorpion nearly overhead.
One of the best-known asterisms that's high in the south at this time of year is the False Cross. Comprising Delta (S) and Kappa ([kappa]) Velorum, and Iota (t) and Epsilon ([epsilon]) Carinae, it's mistaken by many newcomers to this region of the night sky for the real Southern Cross, Crux, which lies about 25[degrees] farther east and is smaller and brighter.
Moving along the Milky Way we can find four stars in Carina and Vela that form an asterism known as the False Cross: 2.2-magnitude Iota ([??]) and 2.0-magnitude Epsilon ([epsilon]) Carinae, and 2.0-magnitude Delta and 2.5-magnitude Kappa ([kappa]) Velorum.
Above Crux is an asterism of four stars making a larger, dimmer cross, the False Cross. The longer arm of the False Cross points roughly to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).
The area surrounding the False Cross (where Carina and Vela meet) is alive with beautiful binocular clusters.
It spans from the False Cross in the south-west, up through Crux and Centaurus, to the curved figure of Scorpius the Scorpion nearly overhead.
It forms the western tip of the bright asterism known as the False Cross.
This glorious nebula can be seen with the naked eye as the brightest patch along the southern Milky Way, midway between the Southern Cross and the False Cross. Binoculars show two large fans of nebulosity separated by a dark gap.
EAST OF THE FALSE CROSS ASTERISM, 5 1/2[degrees] from Iota ([iota]) Carinae, lies NGC 3114--a splendid, if overlooked, binocular cluster.
RIDING HIGH in the March evening sky is the asterism known as the False Cross, which consists of the stars Delta ([delta]) and Kappa ([kappa]) Velorum, and Epsilon ([epsilon]) and Iota ([iota]) Carinae.
Epsilon and Iota are two members of the False Cross (see page 53).
To its upper right is the False Cross, an asterism of four stars.