false color

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Related to False-color: pseudocoloring

false color

[¦fȯls ¦kəl·ər]
(optics)
Color assigned to frequency bands that are normally invisible to the human eye (such as infrared radiation) in an image in order to enhance contrasts or to display those colors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The false-color view uses an ultraviolet filter centered at 338 nanometers for blue, a green filter centered at 568 nanometers for green and a near-infrared filter centered at 930 nanometers for red -- thus covering a wider spectrum region than the human eye.
The some 100 double-page (and some fold-out) prints collected here depict the preparation of those missions as well as the stark Martian panoramas captured in images both single and composite, both real- and false-color. Bell applies his sensibilities as a lifetime landscape photographer to select artful and varied depictions of the texture of the Red Planet.
But the researchers' new report, which displays the computer-reconstructed brain as a false-color red mass within the grey skull case, suggests that the species "had a brain that might have been even smaller than that of a modern lemur's," Simons said.
Vivid false-color images are created that allow chemical heterogeneity to be readily visualized and compared to visual features.
The plane-mounted camera system uses four separate sensors to obtain true-color and false-color infrared, multispectral images of fire ant mounds.
A false-color VLA radio image shows jets of plasma, a mixture of electrons and atomic nuclei, in Galaxy IC 708.
The MK-4 is a multi-spectral camera with data recorded on four separate, black-and-white film bases to produce a false-color image.
Another photo shared on NASA's website showed a (https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/styles/full_width/public/thumbnails/image/pia18394-nasa.jpg?itok=sVrrKA_-) false-color panorama of the Pilinger Point in the Endeavour Crater.
Caption: Culinary cartography This false-color global map of Ceres obtained by the Dawn spacecraft highlights the dwarf planet's newly named features and its changing mineral composition.
Their yellow color comes from the combined glow of warm dust (red) and organic molecules (green) in false-color infrared images from the Spitzer Space Telescope.