Familists

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Familists

(făm`ĭlĭsts), religious community founded in Friesland in the 16th cent. by Hendrik Niclaes. Niclaes, a merchant of Münster and originally a Roman Catholic, claimed to have been chosen prophet and prepared by special outpouring of the "spirit of the true love of Jesus Christ." His teachings combined elements of German mysticism with Anabaptist doctrines and the ethic of religious perfection. Making Emden his headquarters, he spread his beliefs, traveling much, particularly in Flanders and England. At Emden was first established (c.1540) the Family of Love, as his community was called. It held that the divine spirit of love within it placed it above Bible, creeds, liturgy, and law. However, since no specific form of worship was prescribed, many of its members remained in the Roman communion. They were, however, bound together into a hierarchical communistic organization. In 1560, Niclaes had to leave Emden, and he escaped to England. There his movement gained adherents although its emotionalism was frowned upon by the orthodox. There was some government procedure against them under Elizabeth I and James I. Although the sect died out in the 17th cent., it strongly influenced similar radical groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
The inclusion of toponyms relating to the End of Days within all the cordiform maps also support readings well beyond those suggested by Mangani and his proposal of hermetic readings related to Familist Love.
mi s-a necinstit onoarea de familist, acum nu mai imi pasa, macar sa intru si-n cremenal
For a detailed discussion of the Familist sect see Christopher Marsh, The Family of Love in English Society, 1550-1630 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994).
Mistress Purge's subversion of the domestic spatial order, expressed through bodily deviation, brings the problem of Familist sacred space fully into focus.
And there was no limitation or exception against Turk Jew Papist Arian Socinian Nicholaytan Familist or any other.
As early as 1645 a majority of the House of Delegates was in favor of a resolution for a "full and free toleration of religion to all men," without "exception against Turk, Jew, I Papist, Arian, Socinian, Familist, or any other, but the governor would not put the question to a vote, so it failed to become law.
The relative weakness of union leadership, and the relative strength of capital's government allies and a suffocating individualist (rather than familist, as in Japan) capitalist culture, was memorialized in the failure of industrial unions to ask for lifetime employment.
Similarly, the 1970s women's movement that emerged in Israel had a uniquely familist focus (as opposed to its U.
Necessary to this process is the acknowledgment of feminist and queer interests: "By making common cause across communities, queer and feminist discourses not only decentralize the familist model of nationalisms but potentially destabilize the two-community model that has for so long shaped Northern politics" (19).
On the supply side, as a result of increasing female labour force participation, it cannot be assumed that women are available to carry out the traditional familist role of caregiving.
Halley, Heresy, Orthodoxy, and the Politics of Religious Discourse: The Case of the English Family of Love, 15 Representations 98, 104 (1986) ("I've been unable to discover a Familist text that rules out one of these readings.
83-100) hypothesized a variety of ramifications of the amoral familist culture which he indeed observed during his stay in the village.

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