family therapy

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family therapy

[¦fam·i·lē ′ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
Treatment of more than one family member in the same therapeutic session.

family therapy

a treatment, usually for disturbed children, employing PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC or COUNSELLING methods, based on the premise that a child's behaviour is the product of a complex of interacting family relationships. To understand why a child is unhappy or exhibiting behaviour problems it is essential that he or she is regarded as part of the family system, therefore the whole family is seen by the therapist. By being able to assess where the stresses are within the family, the therapist is able to suggest ways in which the balance may be restored. The ‘problem’ behaviour may be ‘referred’ from another part of the family system (e.g. when the parents are not happy in their marital relationship), and, similarly, it will be affecting the rest of the family system. Adjustment to one part of the system will have repercussions on other parts, therefore the whole family is involved in the treatment process (see SYSTEMS THEORY for the theoretical concepts involved).
References in periodicals archive ?
The genogram is an assessment tool used in Bowen's (1966) family systems theory to visually show attitudinal and behavioral connections between family generations.
Family Systems Theory should be applied to the facts surrounding TPR
Central to the proposed relationship between spirituality and Bowen's family systems theory is the concept of the differentiation of sell or more simply differentiation.
We propose that service-learning activities, when integrated into an introductory family counseling course, offer rich opportunities for students to apply family systems theory to real-life situations.
Family-centered practices are based on family systems theory adapted from the disciplines of psychology and social work (Wayman & Lynch, 1991).
If family systems theory is to be a useful tool for approaching works of fiction of non-documentary film, it should allow us to do so in part by gaining a better sense of how it is that the formal structures chosen by an author of filmmaker to dramatize family dynamics can help us better understand those dynamics.
The purpose of this study was to determine whether Bowen family systems theory (Bowen, 1976, 1978; Kerr & Bowen, 1988) was relevant for persons of color.
The process also seemed to have much in common with other interventions informed by family systems theory or practices such as narrative therapy (White & Epston, 1990; Niemeyer, 2001; Perry, 2002).
I use the lens of family systems theory to observe how family structure and dynamics in Las edades de Lulu affect the narrator-protagonist, Lulu.
Family systems theory as a framework for understanding the common family dynamics observed in families where there is sibling abuse is discussed.
Hewlett develops an ecological family systems theory of paternal care-giving, arguing that shared communicative activity between partners leads to greater partner intimacy, as well as increased infant care by fathers.