family therapy

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family therapy

[¦fam·i·lē ′ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
Treatment of more than one family member in the same therapeutic session.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

family therapy

a treatment, usually for disturbed children, employing PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC or COUNSELLING methods, based on the premise that a child's behaviour is the product of a complex of interacting family relationships. To understand why a child is unhappy or exhibiting behaviour problems it is essential that he or she is regarded as part of the family system, therefore the whole family is seen by the therapist. By being able to assess where the stresses are within the family, the therapist is able to suggest ways in which the balance may be restored. The ‘problem’ behaviour may be ‘referred’ from another part of the family system (e.g. when the parents are not happy in their marital relationship), and, similarly, it will be affecting the rest of the family system. Adjustment to one part of the system will have repercussions on other parts, therefore the whole family is involved in the treatment process (see SYSTEMS THEORY for the theoretical concepts involved).
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Randomized trial of behavioral family systems therapy for diabetes: maintenance of effects on diabetes outcomes in adolescents.
Family systems therapy developed out of a broad confluence of influences in the mental health field.
Innovations and Elaborations in Internal Family Systems Therapy
Her theoretical orientations include coaching, affirmative therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, family systems therapy, and solution-focused brief therapy.
It describes a wide range of approaches, including behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, psychodynamic therapy, constructivism, family systems therapy and atheoretical and transtheoretical techniques.
Part 2 of the book is entitled "Theoretical Dimensions: Dilemmas and Contradictions in the Approaches of Family Systems Therapy and Psychopharmacological Practice." This part has five chapters, all of them written by physicians.
Building on Internal Family Systems therapy (IFS), therapist Herbine-Blank created Intimacy from the Inside Out (IFIO) specifically for coupleAEs therapy.
Based in part on family therapy models developed by family therapists including John Bell, Gregory Bateson, Virginia Satir, Murray Bowen, James Framo, Sal Minuchin, Mara Selvini-Palazzoli, Carl Whitaker, and Augustus Napier, family systems therapy helps minimize individual and family dysfunction by helping individuals within the family system recognize interactions that are detrimental to communication.
After completing the initial screening and baseline evaluations, participating families were randomized to one of three conditions: (1) behavioral family systems therapy (BFST), (2) multi-family education/support group (EDSP), or (3) control group with no additional psychosocial intervention (CONT).
As the volume under review demonstrates, Family Systems Therapy (FST) offers a welcome and refreshing alternative in psychologically oriented literary criticism, still dominated by the speculative and outdated Freudian psychoanalysis on the one hand and by the even more speculative and for the most part unintelligible Lacanian theory on the other.