family therapy

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Related to Family therapist: Marriage therapy

family therapy

[¦fam·i·lē ′ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
Treatment of more than one family member in the same therapeutic session.

family therapy

a treatment, usually for disturbed children, employing PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC or COUNSELLING methods, based on the premise that a child's behaviour is the product of a complex of interacting family relationships. To understand why a child is unhappy or exhibiting behaviour problems it is essential that he or she is regarded as part of the family system, therefore the whole family is seen by the therapist. By being able to assess where the stresses are within the family, the therapist is able to suggest ways in which the balance may be restored. The ‘problem’ behaviour may be ‘referred’ from another part of the family system (e.g. when the parents are not happy in their marital relationship), and, similarly, it will be affecting the rest of the family system. Adjustment to one part of the system will have repercussions on other parts, therefore the whole family is involved in the treatment process (see SYSTEMS THEORY for the theoretical concepts involved).
References in periodicals archive ?
Mike Clark and Johnny Embry have been appointed to the Kentucky Board of Licensure of Marriage and Family Therapists.
About 40,000 marriage and family therapists are licensed in the state, compared to about 22,000 social workers and 21,000 psychologists, according to a state analysis of the legislation, Assembly Bill 1863.
As family therapists, we know something about the "home" metaphor in the Patient-Centered Medical Home.
Karen Ruskin, PsyD, LMFT, specializes in solution-focused counseling as a marriage and family therapist.
OH Counselor, Social Worker, & Marriage & Family Therapist Board
Rather than abandoning this approach, a good family therapist will be relentless in the quest to recognize the golden-thread theme that will link future interventions.
Only licensed marriage and family therapists are required to get the specialized training and clinical experience in working with couples and families.
Arab clients expect that a family therapist should be more efficacious than the cultural support system.
Weaver is a clinical psychologist, licensed marriage and family therapist, and an ordained United Methodist minister.
Expanding the treatment system from the individual to the couple or family carries with it some unique challenges and fundamental clinical dilemmas for the marital and family therapist.
This is especially true for Ann Pearlman, an American family therapist who has dared to shed light on the murky past of her family Pearlman dynasty and the betrayal that shaped every single relationship.
One family therapist I worked with briefly told me how she got her 2-year-old to sleep in his own bed: She let him scream for hours by himself in his room.