phantasm

(redirected from Fantasm)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Fantasm: phantasm, Imdb

phantasm

(in the philosophy of Plato) objective reality as distorted by perception
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
Enlarge picture
Phantasm, from the animated theatrical release Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993).

Phantasm

(pop culture)
An “Angel of Death” appears in Gotham City, a shrouded executioner with a skull-like faceplate, slicing through crimelords with a wrist-mounted scythe, then vanishing supernaturally into a wisp of fog. Batman is blamed for the murders, placing the Dark Knight in double jeopardy as he hunts down this vexing vigilante while evading an unremitting police force. Complicating his life is the return of Andrea Beaumont, the first love of the man behind the Bat-mask, Bruce Wayne. And thus begins one of Batman's most personal stories, his heart torn asunder by a flame that still flickers, and his flesh endangered by the blade of the merciless supervillain known as Phantasm. This most poignant of Batman stories … is a cartoon. Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, a 76-minute animated film directed by Eric Radomski and Bruce Timm, was released theatrically on Christmas Day 1993. A spin-off of television's Batman: The Animated Series (1992–1995), Phantasm was envisioned as a made-for-video feature but was upgraded to theatrical status shortly into its production (to producer Warner Bros.' chagrin; the movie performed poorly at the box office, but it later became a home-video favorite). Phantasm was inspired by the Reaper, the slayer in DC Comics' 1987 “Batman: Year Two” storyline. While not as graphic as comics' Reaper (to maintain the film's PG rating), Phantasm's screen presence was buttressed by atmospheric moodiness—the villain's emergence from and disappearance into the fog, plus eerie orchestral nuances by soundtrack composer Shirley Walker— that might have escaped the character had Phantasm originated on the comic-book page. Although the film's revelation (spoiler warning!) that Wayne's love interest Andrea (Dana Delany) was actually Phantasm surprised only the acutely naive (as well as a few little boys who bought the tie-in Phantasm action figure, removed its forbidding cloak, and gasped, “Hey, it's a girl!”), the exceptionally well-made, Art Deco-esque Mask of the Phantasm was, until the release of 2005's live-action Batman Begins, regarded by many Dark Knight devotees as the best Batman movie ever produced.
The Supervillain Book: The Evil Side of Comics and Hollywood © 2006 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This oasis started signifying to me as a gilt-trip for post-Holocaust fantasms dislocated yet somehow pacified by frequent feedings at Chez Bon Bon (the aptly named coffee shop) and the incongruous presence of prosperous Latin Americans.
Although the novel proposes that Gabriel/le could not have known her true sexual identity until she was informed of it in adolescence and that she must therefore have been ignorant of the anatomical differences between the sexes, Massardier-Kenney insists that this is only the grandfather's fantasm "in keeping with the patriarchal prohibition of woman's desire and woman's knowledge" (131).
Ginnane had just completed Fantasm, a low budget sex film shot partially in California and featuring American hardcore stars John Holmes and Uschi Digart.
The stress here is on the fictional nature of the fantasm, its failure to attain closure and its essentially historical, relativistic nature.
The fantasm goes like this: equipped with a hot line to suffering, the Jew enjoys a privileged relation to the WASPS' trauma and therefore can heal or at least witness or at least package it for them.
Byronic invention is a following of one's inclination over-driven by a Falstaffian wish-fulfillment to be innocent of the social trans(ag)gression vehiculated by an excessive speech: "'tis no sin for a man to labor in his vocation." (40) To invent in flight from the fantasm of a traumatic, evil, sinful or wicked past.
As Bhabha himself observes, in Marlow's revelation of the darkness at home in the very heart of Europe through such a "discourse of daemonic doubling," he "beholds the everyday reality of the Western metropolis through the veil of the colonial fantasm."(5) In doing so Marlow performs a perversion of the West's ideal-image of itself as the true seat of civilization and light--a perversion which offers a certain critical leverage for interrupting the perpetuation of this self-image.
Drawing on his characteristic polymathic erudition, Agamben clears away the detritus of scholarly fantasms. He typically pinpoints a key problem in the relevant scholarship, showing how this scholarship falsifies its own evidence to the extent that disputes within the scholarship come to mirror each other without realising it.