fantasy

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fantasy

, phantasy
1. Psychol
a. a series of pleasing mental images, usually serving to fulfil a need not gratified in reality
b. the activity of forming such images
2. Music another word for fantasia fancy, development
3. 
a. literature having a large fantasy content
b. a prose or dramatic composition of this type
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fantasy

[′fan·tə·sē]
(psychology)
An imagined image or series of images that serves to express unconscious conflicts, to gratify unconscious wishes, or to prepare for anticipated future events.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Fantasy

See also Enchantment.
Aladdin’s lamp
when rubbed, genie appears to do possessor’s bidding. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights, “Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp”]
Alice
undergoes fantastic adventures, such as dealing with the “real” Queen of Hearts. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland; Through the Looking Glass]
Alnaschar
dreams of the wealth he will realize from the sale of his glassware. [Arab. Lit.: Benét, 26]
Arabian Nights
compilation of Middle and Far Eastern tales. [Arab. Lit.: Parrinder, 26]
Back to Methuselah
England in the late twenty-second century is a bureaucracy administered by Chinese men and African women. [Br. Drama: Shaw Back to Methuselah in Magill III, 82]
Baggins, Bilbo Hobbit
who wanders afar and brings back the One Ring of Power to The Shire. [Br. Lit.: The Hobbit]
Bloom, Leopold
enlivens his uneventful life with amorous daydreams. [Irish Lit.: Joyce Ulysses in Magill I, 1040]
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
magical car helps track down criminals. [Children’s Lit.: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang]
Dorothy
flies via tornado to Oz. [Am. Lit.: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz]
Dream Children
in a reverie, Charles Lamb tells stories to his two imaginary children. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 287]
Fantasia
music comes to life in animated cartoon. [Am. Cinema: Fantasia in Disney Films, 38–45]
Harvey
six-foot rabbit who appears only to a genial drunkard. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 444]
Jurgen
regaining his lost youth, he has strange “adventures with a host of mythical persons. [Am. Lit.: Jurgen in Magill I, 464]
Land
of the Giants a Gulliver’s Travels in outer space. [TV: Terrace, II, 10–11]
Little Prince, The
travels to Earth from his star; fable by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1943). [Fr. Lit.: Benét, 889]
Lord of the Rings, The
“feigned history” of the Hobbits; epic trilogy written by J. R. R. Tolkein. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 1013]
Millionaire, The
mysterious Croesus bestows fortunes on unsuspecting individuals. [TV: Terrace, II, 97–98]
Mitty, Walter
timid man who imagines himself a hero. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 1006; Am. Cinema and Drama: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty]
Narnia
kingdom in which fantasy cycle of seven tales by C. S. Lewis takes place. [Children’s Lit.: Fisher, 289–290]
O’Gill, Darby
befriends dwarfdom. [Am. Cinema: Darby O’Gill and the Little People in Disney Films, 159–162]
Pan, Peter
escapes to Never Never Land to avoid growing up. [Br. and Am. Drama: Benét, 778]
Poppins, Mary
enchanted nanny guides her charges through fey adventures. [Children’s Lit.: Mary Poppins; Am. Cinema: Mary Poppins in Disney Films, 226–232]
Thirteen Clocks, The
beautiful princess is won by a disguised prince who fulfills her guardian’s task with the aid of laughter that turns to jewels. [Am. Lit.: Thurber The Thirteen Clocks in Weiss, 462]
Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The
adventures in land “somewhere over the rainbow.” [Am. Lit.: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
That Thomas uses "speculative" fiction, rather than science fiction, or SF, in her title, is significant; while both conventional SF and fantasy writing fall under the umbrella of the speculative, that umbrella can be expanded to include what is commonly called "magical realism" as well as almost any work which contains elements of the supernatural or merely the unbelievable.
Writing in Viewpoint Ridge argues that Rowling has broken the most important rule in fantasy writing: that a story must `follow its own internal logic which allows readers to suspend their disbelief of what could not be true in the "real world"'.
Fantasy writing has been a favorite among Japanese authors since the Meiji Revolution.
Similarly, while it is possible to establish the extent of the market for fantasy writing, it is not possible to reach general conclusions about how that material was received by individual readers.
Smith examines changes in fantasy writing for children (and changing attitudes to children) over four stages of evolution: the Didactic Stage (1780-1840), the Enlightenment Stage (1841-99), the Diversionary Stage (1900-49), and the Dynamic Stage (1950-90).
The inclusion of Nickianne Moody's "Maeve and Guinevere: Women's Fantasy Writing in the Science Fiction fantasies, and the marketing connection to science fiction is quite tenuous.
Many of the tales bear the patina of overhandling: Poe's 'The Fall of the House of Usher', Ray Russel's 'Sardonicus', and Isak Dinesen's 'The Monkey' are perennial guests in the numerous omnibuses dedicated to horror and fantasy writing. Hardy, Robert Louis Stevenson, Lovecraft, Hawthorne, and Le Fanu contribute regularly to the same, gift-wrapped compendia.
He was deeply interested in science fiction and fantasy writing and was largely responsible for the popularization of H.
The authors in part four are primarily interested in the cultural and societal implications of knowledge in fantasy writing. The essay by Peter Seyferth, "Utopische Perspektiven: Was uns die philosophische Anthropologie uber Selbstreflexivitat und Autoritat in literarischen Utopien sagen kann," (Utopian Perspectives: What Philosophical Anthropology Can Tell Us about Self-Referentiality and Authority in Literary Utopias) shows how the inherent totalitarianism of utopias is dissolved through self-referentiality, which he demonstrates through a discussion of, for example, Thomas More as well as Ursula K.
She won the Arthur Ellis Award for Best Mystery Story, and several awards for her dark fantasy writing and editing, including the Paris Book Festival's Best Anthology of the Year for Danse Macabre.
This volume gives a sense of Mirrlees's range and ambition, which will further add to our sense of her as an important figure in modern fantasy writing.
Recently, Willis won the 2011 Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement in science fiction and/or fantasy writing from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.