fantasy

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fantasy

, phantasy
1. Psychol
a. a series of pleasing mental images, usually serving to fulfil a need not gratified in reality
b. the activity of forming such images
2. Music another word for fantasia fancy, development
3. 
a. literature having a large fantasy content
b. a prose or dramatic composition of this type
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fantasy

[′fan·tə·sē]
(psychology)
An imagined image or series of images that serves to express unconscious conflicts, to gratify unconscious wishes, or to prepare for anticipated future events.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Fantasy

See also Enchantment.
Aladdin’s lamp
when rubbed, genie appears to do possessor’s bidding. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights, “Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp”]
Alice
undergoes fantastic adventures, such as dealing with the “real” Queen of Hearts. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland; Through the Looking Glass]
Alnaschar
dreams of the wealth he will realize from the sale of his glassware. [Arab. Lit.: Benét, 26]
Arabian Nights
compilation of Middle and Far Eastern tales. [Arab. Lit.: Parrinder, 26]
Back to Methuselah
England in the late twenty-second century is a bureaucracy administered by Chinese men and African women. [Br. Drama: Shaw Back to Methuselah in Magill III, 82]
Baggins, Bilbo Hobbit
who wanders afar and brings back the One Ring of Power to The Shire. [Br. Lit.: The Hobbit]
Bloom, Leopold
enlivens his uneventful life with amorous daydreams. [Irish Lit.: Joyce Ulysses in Magill I, 1040]
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
magical car helps track down criminals. [Children’s Lit.: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang]
Dorothy
flies via tornado to Oz. [Am. Lit.: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz]
Dream Children
in a reverie, Charles Lamb tells stories to his two imaginary children. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 287]
Fantasia
music comes to life in animated cartoon. [Am. Cinema: Fantasia in Disney Films, 38–45]
Harvey
six-foot rabbit who appears only to a genial drunkard. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 444]
Jurgen
regaining his lost youth, he has strange “adventures with a host of mythical persons. [Am. Lit.: Jurgen in Magill I, 464]
Land
of the Giants a Gulliver’s Travels in outer space. [TV: Terrace, II, 10–11]
Little Prince, The
travels to Earth from his star; fable by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1943). [Fr. Lit.: Benét, 889]
Lord of the Rings, The
“feigned history” of the Hobbits; epic trilogy written by J. R. R. Tolkein. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 1013]
Millionaire, The
mysterious Croesus bestows fortunes on unsuspecting individuals. [TV: Terrace, II, 97–98]
Mitty, Walter
timid man who imagines himself a hero. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 1006; Am. Cinema and Drama: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty]
Narnia
kingdom in which fantasy cycle of seven tales by C. S. Lewis takes place. [Children’s Lit.: Fisher, 289–290]
O’Gill, Darby
befriends dwarfdom. [Am. Cinema: Darby O’Gill and the Little People in Disney Films, 159–162]
Pan, Peter
escapes to Never Never Land to avoid growing up. [Br. and Am. Drama: Benét, 778]
Poppins, Mary
enchanted nanny guides her charges through fey adventures. [Children’s Lit.: Mary Poppins; Am. Cinema: Mary Poppins in Disney Films, 226–232]
Thirteen Clocks, The
beautiful princess is won by a disguised prince who fulfills her guardian’s task with the aid of laughter that turns to jewels. [Am. Lit.: Thurber The Thirteen Clocks in Weiss, 462]
Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The
adventures in land “somewhere over the rainbow.” [Am. Lit.: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite such dangers, the heroes of fantasy fiction repeatedly journey into the wild woods, because the forest is a liminal space of testing and transformation.
The second chapter, "Make It Old: The Other Mythic Method," examines fantasy fiction by the Inklings and others in the early twentieth century and persuasively argues that their mythic work is "not an anachronistic alternative to Modernism" but "part and parcel of the era, partaking fully in its cultural convulsions" (42).
Lewis, and makes it clear that he does not think fantasy fiction contains engagements with the Middle Ages that are worthy of study.
GAIMAN is a modern master of fantasy fiction, with his work appealing to both adults and children alike.
Randy, 50, who works as a lorry driver, writes fantasy fiction in his spare time.
Daniel Heath Justice's trilogy The Way of Thorn and Thunder (Kegedonce Press)--the second book was published last month--offers the best in fantasy fiction, that genre of literature dealing with the supernatural.
L Ron Hubbard wrote stories for pulp magazines such as Startling Stories, Astounding Science Fiction and Unknown Fantasy Fiction.
Recommended for older teens who enjoy short fantasy fiction; this anthology could also be a useful title in schools where fairy tales are studied as part of a creative writing or literature unit.
Fantasy fiction, in both its broad and narrow senses, draws upon this force, this continual location and dislocation.
Like the best fantasy fiction and movies, Bully offers a stylized and often witty expression of the grandiose emotions that can plague teenagers as they make the often-troubling passage from childhood to adulthood--without being as painfully earnest as Dawson's Creek.
The simulacrum is extended further through a series of fantasy fiction books based on the various card sets as well as in playing the game in an online version.
Le Guin also wrote non-science fiction and essays on fantasy fiction, feminist issues, and other topics, some of them collected in The Language of the Night (1979) and Dancing at the Edge of the World (1989).