Fraunhofer diffraction

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Fraunhofer diffraction

[′frau̇n‚hōf·ər di‚frak·shən]
(optics)
Diffraction of a beam of parallel light observed at an effectively infinite distance from the diffracting object, usually with the aid of lenses which collimate the light before diffraction and focus it at the point of observation.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the lens L2, the far-field diffraction pattern in the back focal plane of L1 is imaged onto the CCD camera that records and saves the experimental images of the POV diffraction pattern.
On the other hand, we also can verify the nature of the POVs through their far-field diffraction patterns by an equilateral triangular aperture.
thus, the key problem in solvinv for the far-field pattern of the zone plate is that of the far-field diffraction pattern of the circular aperture.