Faraday's law of induction


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Faraday's law of induction

A statement relating an induced electromotive force (emf) to the change in magnetic flux that produces it. For any flux change that takes place in a circuit, Faraday's law states that the magnitude of the emf ξ induced in the circuit is proportional to the rate of change of flux as in the expression below.

The time rate of change of flux in this expression may refer to any kind of flux change that takes place. If the change is motion of a conductor through a field, dΦ/dt refers to the rate of cutting flux. If the change is an increase or decrease in flux linking a coil, dΦ/dt refers to the rate of such change. It may refer to a motion or to a change that involves no motion. See Electromagnetic induction

References in periodicals archive ?
* "Is there any theoretical reason behind multiplying by N when using Faraday's law of induction?"
For example, I, and presumably many others, have been led by commentaries on the Treatise to believe that Maxwell did not write down Faraday's law of induction (induced electromotive force) explicitly in his Treatise and that it was Heaviside and Hertz who first expressed "Maxwell's equations" in their more familiar contemporary form.
nPower is a vibration harvesting technology that produces power by using Faraday's law of induction: the induced electromotive force (EMF) in any closed circuit is equal to the time rate of change of the magnetic flux through the circuit.
time graph shows the alternating voltage produced by this type of generator and the voltage amplitude increases with time as predicted by Faraday's law of induction. A graph of rms voltage vs.