farad

(redirected from Farads)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Farads: capacitance

farad

(făr`əd) [for Michael FaradayFaraday, Michael
, 1791–1867, English scientist. The son of a blacksmith, he was apprenticed to a bookbinder at the age of 14. He had little formal education, but acquired a store of scientific knowledge through reading and by attending educational lectures including, in
..... Click the link for more information.
], unit of electrical capacitancecapacitance,
in electricity, capability of a body, system, circuit, or device for storing electric charge. Capacitance is expressed as the ratio of stored charge in coulombs to the impressed potential difference in volts.
..... Click the link for more information.
, equivalent to 1 coulomb of stored charge per volt of applied potential difference.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Farad

 

the unit of electrical capacitance in the International System of Units and in the meter-kilogram-second-ampere (MKSA) system of units. The symbol for the farad, which was named after M. Faraday, is F. One farad is the capacitance of a capacitor in which a charge of 1 coulomb produces a potential difference of 1 volt between the plates. The unit of capacitance in the centimeter-gram-second (cgs) electrostatic system is 1 cm = (109/c2) F ≈ 1.113 × 10–12F, where c is the numerical value of the speed of light in a vacuum in cm/sec. In practice, the following fractional units are used more frequently than the farad: the microfarad (µLF), which equals 10–6F, and the picofarad (pF), which equals 10–12F.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

farad

[′fa‚rad]
(electricity)
The unit of capacitance in the meter-kilogram-second system, equal to the capacitance of a capacitor which has a potential difference of 1 volt between its plates when the charge on one of its plates is 1 coulomb, there being an equal and opposite charge on the other plate. Symbolized F.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

farad

Physics the derived SI unit of electric capacitance; the capacitance of a capacitor between the plates of which a potential of 1 volt is created by a charge of 1 coulomb.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Farad

A standard unit of measurement for capacitors (capacitance). Named after the English physicist Michael Faraday, one Farad (F) is equal to an increase of one volt when a charge of one coulomb is applied. In microelectronics, measurements are typically in microFarads (mF) or picoFarads (pF). See capacitance, coulomb and Faraday cage.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Giving numbers to trends in capacitor performance and costs requires some capacitor language: capacitance and farad. Capacitance refers to the capacitor's unique ability to store electrostatic energy (which is different than the electrochemical energy stored by the battery).
According to ACI, capacitances of more than 104 farads per gram and energy densities of more than 325 kilojoule per kilogram have been demonstrated with carbon aerogel ultracapacitors, as have power densities of up to 20 kilowatts per kilogram.