Fashoda Incident


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Fashoda Incident

(fəshō`də), 1898, diplomatic dispute between France and Great Britain. Toward the end of the 19th cent., while Britain was seeking to establish a continuous strip of territory from Cape Town to Cairo, France desired to establish an overland route from the Red Sea to the Atlantic Ocean. To make good their claim the French dispatched (May 1, 1897) Major J. B. MarchandMarchand, Jean Baptiste
, 1863–1934, French explorer and general. Sent to Africa (1897) to establish French control of the headwaters of the White Nile, Marchand led a heroic trek through uncharted terrain.
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 with a small force from Brazzaville, in the face of a British warning. After crossing over 2,000 mi (3,200 km) of almost unexplored wilderness, Marchand reached (July 10, 1898) the village of Fashoda (now KodokKodok
, formerly Fashoda
, town, NE South Sudan, on the White Nile. In 1898 it was the scene of the Fashoda Incident, which brought Britain and France to the brink of war and resulted, in 1899, in an Anglo-French agreement establishing the frontier between Sudan and
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) on the Nile in the S Sudan (now in NE South Sudan). Beating off a Mahdist attack, he stopped there to await an expected Franco-Ethiopian expedition from the east. Meanwhile, Lord Kitchener's Anglo-Egyptian army had defeated (Sept. 2) the Mahdists in the N Sudan. When he heard of the French activities, Kitchener led forces upriver to Fashoda and, despite Marchand's presence, claimed (Sept. 19) the town for Egypt. The French government resisted for a time, but, fearing war, ordered its mission to withdraw on Nov. 3. In Mar., 1899, France yielded its claim to the upper Nile region and accepted part of the Sahara as compensation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fashoda incident of 1898: Encounter on the Nile, oxford, oxford university Press, 1984.
This rivalry was at first kept in check following the Fashoda Incident in 1898, which brought Britain and France to the edge of hostilities, and then the alliance was maintained by the necessity of winning the First World War.
Relations between the two states reached a nadir during the two simultaneous scandals, with the colonial rivalry arising from the Fashoda Incident of September 1898 adding fuel to a smouldering fire.
Louis Napoleon, exiled heir to the French throne, was killed by Zulus in 1879, and the Fashoda Incident was a diplomatic sabre rattling between France and England in 1898 in Sudan.
The incidents leading up to the First World War came out of this mode of thinking, such as the 1898 Fashoda incident over the headwaters of the Nile River that gave rise to a near conflict between Third Republic France and late Victorian Britain.
The memory of the recent Fashoda incident in Africa was still alive in people's minds and the Boer War (in which Lord Beauchamp was to lose a brother) further widened the breach between the two nations.
Carpenter mentions several such cases and focuses on the 1898 Fashoda Incident, a war scare between France and Great Britain over control of the Nile River.
Johnson's Preface and his admirably researched Historical Overview from the 1890's (the Fashoda Incident) to the present time set a scene into which he neatly slots the governorship of C.
A major factor in the Fashoda incident as it was about to develop was the superiority of British over French communications.
Those included the U.S.-British confrontation over the Trent affair in 1861, the Anglo-American crisis over the Venezuela boundary dispute in the mid-1890s, and the British-French war scare over control of the Nile River (the so-called Fashoda incident) in 1898.
By the middle of the nineteenth century the countries had been allies in the Crimean War and tunnel ideas were current; they went into cold storage during and after the Franco-Prussian war and deteriorated in the 1890s (aggravated by the "Fashoda incident') until, stimulated by the Frncophile Edward VII, the 1904 Anglo-French protocol nicknamed the `Entente Cordiale' was signed.