Fatsia


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Fatsia

 

a genus of evergreen shrubs or small trees of the family Araliaceae. The leaves are large and palmately lobed. The tiny pentamerous or hexamerous inconspicuous flowers are in small umbels, gathered into large panicles. The only species is the houseplant F. japonica.

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Fatsia japonica would also work well in this way and there are some beautiful varieties of Fatsia polycarpa available with deeply lobed foliage.
SHADE-LOVING PLANTS There are plants that prefer to be in the shade, such as mahonia aquifolium, fatsia japonica and spotted laurel.
If you can see the garden all year long, you have to ensure that you have winter interest in the form of structural evergreens such as tree ferns or fatsia, trees with attractive bark, winter flowering plants such as cyclamen, and/or interesting planters, and garden artwork.
uk, 01509 621300) TROPICAL SCHEME Whilst Fatsia is a hardy shrub, it looks like an exotic foliage plant.
WHILE Fatsia is a hardy evergreen shrub, it looks like an exotic foliage plant so is good for Fatsia a tropic ing schem October to J f f a tropical planting scheme.
Other great specimens for contemporary pots include the tropical-looking Fatsia japonica, with its gloriously glossy leaves, or with dramatic bamboos and ornamental grasses.
A real showstopper is Fatsia japonica, with its exotic, glossy leaves, which could easily make a stand-alone specimen.
Now planted with lush liriope, fatsia, and camellia japonica, it is a favorite spot for guests to linger, and Sandy created a path to the gazebo that continues around the back of the new wing, making a full circle.
Broad-leaved cannas, hostas, deep orange dahlias, fiery crocosmias and tender bulbs such as gloriosa will all add heat to the scene, while plants of architectural interest such as Fatsia japonica, palms, cordyline and phormium can all add to that tropical feel.
Plant of the week FATSIA WHILE it is prevalent in house plant books, the fatsia is not so well recorded in shrub guides, yet it is quite hardy in most parts of Britain and can grow to about 10ft, producing candelabra-like flowers in October.
Other good shrubs to consider would be the cotoneasters, fatsia japonica, the pieris or Forest Flames and pyracantha.
Best of the bunch If you can, check out the valuable evergreen shrub fatsia japonic.