Fatsia


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Fatsia

 

a genus of evergreen shrubs or small trees of the family Araliaceae. The leaves are large and palmately lobed. The tiny pentamerous or hexamerous inconspicuous flowers are in small umbels, gathered into large panicles. The only species is the houseplant F. japonica.

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Fatsia japonica, or castor oil, is another familiar plant but is nonetheless dramatic and sculptural in winter.
A FATSIA is a tough hardy evergreen shrub that looks like an exotic foliage plant but will thrive even on neglect and in shade.
One of my favourite shrubs is the castor oil palm fatsia japonica, with its huge, deep green, tropical leaves all year round.
Here, vanda orchids, cymbidium orchids, coral gloriosas, peonias, date branches, grand prix roses, fatsia leaves and feathers were used.
In the study, lead author Kwang Jin Kim of Korea's National Horticultural Research Institute compared the absorption rate of two types of houseplants, Weeping Fig (Ficus benjamina) and Fatsia japonica, an evergreen shrub.
If you don't want to replant or create a totally new border, buy some specimen plants to act as focal points in your existing garden, such as Phormium tenax, with its sword-shaped leaves, or Fatsia japonica, which provides sculptural foliage in a shady spot, callicarpa or cotoneaster for colourful berries and Acer palmatum for a real burst of autumn colour.
At the base, use drifts of hellebores, epimedium and pachysandras and build up initial height with a layer of Fatsia, Dicksonia antarctica and clouds of Pittosporum Nanum.
SHADE-LOVING PLANTS There are plants that prefer to be in the shade, such as mahonia aquifolium, fatsia japonica and spotted laurel.
On a shady balcony, camellias, fatsia, certain helleborus, hostas and rhododendrons are suitable for pots and containers.
WHILE Fatsia is a hardy evergreen shrub, it looks like an exotic foliage plant so is good for Fatsia a tropic ing schem October to J f f a tropical planting scheme.