Fatsia


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fatsia

 

a genus of evergreen shrubs or small trees of the family Araliaceae. The leaves are large and palmately lobed. The tiny pentamerous or hexamerous inconspicuous flowers are in small umbels, gathered into large panicles. The only species is the houseplant F. japonica.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The Fatsia likes well-drained soil, but Mahonia japonica prefers it a bit cooler.
SURVIVOR: japonica u Fa lar ana Fatsia japonica is great for its large, deeply-lobed glossy leaves and will survive most weathers and conditions.
There is no need to panic as Fatsia japonica cannot be used to harvest that strange elixir that some of us were given in our younger days.
* GARDEN STUNNERS: Statement plants such as Kniphofia (Red Hot Pokers) left, Bergenia (Elephant Ears) top, and Fatsia japonica, above, can make a real difference to the structure of your garden
Plants that will thrive in shady places include Tartus Botanicus and Fatsia, an evergreen shrub which can grow more than 2m high and 3m wide with large attractive leaves and whiteish flowers in early spring.
Fatsia japonica is a great shrub to give your garden some structural backbone with its glossy green, boldly shaped leaves.
Well, Mr and Mrs Shaw from Honley have a Fatsia japonica in their garden and its common name is the false castor oil plant purely and simply because its foliage resembles that of the true castor oil plant.
GOOD CHOICE: Sorbus Cashmiriana, above, and Fatsia japonica, right, are good choices for winter gardens; TOUCH OF COLOUR: Cornus alba
WE USED: Ornamental grasses from pounds 2.95, fatsia in 3l pot pounds 13.50, grapevine in 3l pot pounds 9.50 and tree fern in 15l pot pounds 62.50.
Hebe "Autumn Glory" opens its purple bottle brush flowers late in the season, while the tropical-looking Fatsia japonica has fantastic-looking glossy palmate, evergreen leaves and also produces greenish-white flowers in late autumn.
Fatsia japonica, loved by flower arrangers, is hardy and makes a really lush specimen but I prefer the ricinus with its darker foliage.
If you don't want to replant or create a totally new border, buy some specimen plants to act as focal points, such as Phormium tenax, with its sword-shaped leaves, or Fatsia japonica, which provides sculptural foliage in a shady spot, callicarpa or cotoneaster for colourful berries and Acer palmatum for a burst of autumn colour.