fatty acid

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fatty acid,

any of the organic carboxylic acids present in fats and oilsfats and oils,
group of organic substances that form an important part of the diet and also are useful in many industries. The fats are usually solid, the oils generally liquid at ordinary room temperatures.
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 as esters of glycerolglycerol,
 glycerin,
 glycerine,
or 1,2,3-propanetriol
, CH2OHCHOHCH2OH, colorless, odorless, sweet-tasting, syrupy liquid. Glycerol is a trihydric alcohol. It melts at 17.
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. Molecular weights of fatty acids vary over a wide range. The carbon skeleton of any fatty acid is unbranched. Some fatty acids are saturated, i.e., each carbon atom is connected to its carbon atom neighbors by single bonds; and some fatty acids are unsaturated, i.e., contain at least one carbon-carbon double bond (see chemical bondchemical bond,
mechanism whereby atoms combine to form molecules. There is a chemical bond between two atoms or groups of atoms when the forces acting between them are strong enough to lead to the formation of an aggregate with sufficient stability to be regarded as an
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). When fats and oils are hydrolyzed with an alkali, the fatty acids are liberated as their metal salts; these salts are soaps. Butyric acidbutyric acid
or butanoic acid
, CH3CH2CH2CO2H, viscous, foul-smelling, liquid carboxylic acid; m.p. about −5°C;; b.p. 163.5°C;. It is miscible with water, ethanol, and ether.
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 is a fatty acid found in butter.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

fatty acid

[¦fad·ē ′as·əd]
(organic chemistry)
An organic monobasic acid of the general formula Cn H2 n + 1COOH derived from the saturated series of aliphatic hydrocarbons; examples are palmitic acid, stearic acid, and oleic acid; used as a lubricant in cosmetics and nutrition, and for soaps and detergents.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fatty acid

1. any of a class of aliphatic carboxylic acids, such as palmitic acid, stearic acid, and oleic acid, that form part of a lipid molecule
2. another name for carboxylic acid esp a naturally occurring one
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mediterranean diet, on the other hand, has a healthier balance between Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. Many studies have shown that people who follow this diet are less likely to develop heart disease.
The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids our diet today is estimated to be more than 10:1; some estimates are as high as 30:1.
Increasing the duration of flax supplementation resulted in a plateau in backfat omega-3 fatty acids when feeding 5% flax for 8 weeks.
(10) The infant intestinal absorption of saturated lauric (95%), myristic (84%), palmitic (97%) and stearic fatty acids (91%) was greater after the consumption of Betapol formula compared with the standard (76%, 11%, 78%, 75%; p<0.05) and intermediate (83%, 30%, 86%, 82%, p<0.05) formulas.
During follow-up, the rate of new atrial fibrillation was 23% among patients not taking an omega-3 fatty acid, and 9% among those on an researcher in the department of pharmacy practice.
A reduction in inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein, IL-6, COX and lipoxygenase (LOX), has been correlated with a high intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).
Trans and polyunsaturated fatty acids correlated well with the corresponding fatty acids in the diet, regardless of MetS status.
Role of fatty acids of milk and dairy products in cardiovascular diseases: A review.
Fatty acids (% of###Unfertilized###Semen###Fertilized eggs###Eyed embryo###Yolk-sac larvae###Larvae after
Fatty fish such as salmon, trout, anchovies, sardines, and herring contain the highest amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, although all fish contain some levels.
Omega-3 essential fatty acids therapy for dry eye syndrome: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies.
Omega-3 fatty acids are comprised of a-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid [1, 2].

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