Faunalia

Faunalia

December 5 and February 13
In Roman mythology Faunus was a god of the forest who was also associated with fertility. It was believed that eerie noises in the woods came from Faunus. The Faunalia was mostly celebrated by farmers and other rural workers on December 5 with feasting and games. For a time, city-dwellers adopted the festival and observed it on February 13.
Faunus was known as the brother, father, or husband of Bona Dea. Lupercus, the fertility god associated with the Lupercalia, was also identified with Faunus, as was Inuus, the fertilizer of cattle. The Fauni, or fauns, were spirits of the forest who resembled the satyrs of Greek legend.
SOURCES:
DictFolkMyth-1984, p. 372
DictRomRel-1996, p. 73
FestRom-1981, pp. 72, 201
NewCentClassHandbk-1962, p. 479
OxClassDict-1970, p. 432
RomFest-1925, p. 256
(c)
References in periodicals archive ?
// Heroes y lapitas, proceres de Tesalia / cantan el himeneo en medio de la faunalia...".
Be that as it may, its practices are quite interesting: and faunalia, with its darkly erotic combination of elements is one such.
Two festivals called Faunalia were held on February 13 and December 5.
En locas faunalias no sientes el viento que arrecia, el viento que arrecia del lado del ferreo Berlin, y alli bajo el templo que tu alma pagana desprecia, tu vate hecho polvo no puede sonar su clarin.