faun

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faun:

see FaunusFaunus
, in Roman religion, woodland deity, protector of herds and crops. He was identified with the Greek Pan. His festival was observed on Dec. 5 with dancing and merrymaking.
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faun

(in Roman legend) a rural deity represented as a man with a goat's ears, horns, tail, and hind legs
References in periodicals archive ?
That this group is seen by Susan and Lucy is appropriate to their gender, as Caspian's gender made him appropriate for a dance with the fauns. Susan's comment that she wouldn't have liked to meet the wild girls without Aslan being there (141) suggests the Christian control and the generic control of this material, making it safely non-erotic (or lacking in "love interest").
He claimed to have had conversations with spirits in and around the Botanics and wrote about his experiences in the wrote about his experiences in the book the Gentleman and the Faun.
Art is omnipresent in Hawthorne's The Marble Faun: three of the novel's characters are artists, its title refers to both a character of the novel and a work of art, and Rome with its "museum world" (Lounsbery 242) provides the novel's setting.
"Slaves and Fauns: Hawthorne and the Uses of Primitivism." ELH 57.4 (1990): 901-37.
Dazzling audiences in The Moor's Pavane and Afternoon of a Faun, the charismatic performer also partnered Neve Campbell in Robert Altman's 2003 film, The Company.
These tiny fauns, called panisci (a word related to "panic"), are the key to Dempsey's argument that Poliziano alone could have devised such a program.
The other works in this collection include the "Scarf-Dance," a scene from Chaminade's ballet-symphony Callirhoe, Opus 37, and four character pieces: La Lisonjera, Opus 50 (The Flatterer); Arlequine, Opus 53; Les Sylvains, Opus 60 (The Fauns) and L'Ondine.
While Vilain is careful to show that Hofmannsthal was aware of Mallarme's poem, it is nevertheless true that fauns appeared widely in the literature and iconography of the time.
In an earlier series, "Variations on Rubens," 1986-93, fauns and maidens frolic amid swirls of richly saturated colors surrou nded and supported by bold checkerboards of primary and secondary hues; this antiphonal discourse is both raucous and reassuring, as nothing is out of control in a structural system that both sustains and provokes natural exuberance.
And the whole thing ends with a silly, gorgeous, and ultimately ecstatic duet by Dendy and Keigwin as two Nijinsky fauns.
In the woods by the Yonne the nymphs Were forced with dirty smocks, and fauns took casual aim.