Fausta

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Fausta

(Flavia Maximiana Fausta) (fôs`tə), d. c.326, Roman princess. She was the wife of Constantine IConstantine I
or Constantine the Great
, 288?–337, Roman emperor, b. Naissus (present-day Niš, Serbia). He was the son of Constantius I and Helena and was named in full Flavius Valerius Constantinus.
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, the daughter of MaximianMaximian
(Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus) , d. 310, Roman emperor, with Diocletian (286–305). An able commander, he was made caesar (subemperor) by Diocletian in 285 and augustus in 286.
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, and the mother of Constantine II, Constantius II, and Constans I. It is said that she was put to death by Constantine I when she falsely accused Crispus, Constantine's son by his first wife, of attempting to seduce her.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists haven't known why tumors reappear in many patients who bad seemed free of their earlier cancer, says Nelson Fausto of the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle.
Last year, Fausto and his mother immigrated from the Oaxaca region of Southern Mexico.
This plate was published in Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei disegnati e descritti by Fausto and Felice Niccolini, a work published in successive volumes, starting in 1854.
After a rigorous 40-hour course week, the subsequent graduation ceremonies were presided over by Lieutenant General Fausto Manuel Zamorano Esparza, Director General of Administration in the Secretariat of National Defense.
Los autores son destacados profesores de la Universidad de Milan y en el caso del profesor Fausto Pocar ademas, juez en la Corte de La Haya establecida para juzgar la violacion de los Derechos Humanos durante la guerra en los Balcanes.
An impressive group of sculptures opened this section; prominent among them was Fausto Melotti's Costante uomo (Constant man), 1936, a schematically anthropomorphic figure in plaster, larger than life, on whose chest a hand is engraved.
Chapter 2 examines the differing responses of ten of the most influential Italian Petrarch commentators (Antonio da Tempo, Francesco Filelfo, Hieronimo Squarzafico, Alessandro Vellutello, Giovanni Antonio Gesualdo, Sylvano da Venafro, Bernardino Daniello, Fausto da Longiano, Antonio Brucioli, and Lodovico Castelvetro).
At the center is his father, Fausto, a disappointed bully who peacocks around like a dethroned king.
Argentine poet and journalist whose Fausto is one of the major works of gaucho poetry.