FDISK


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FDISK

(operating system, tool)
(Fixed disk utility) An MS-DOS utility program which prepares a hard disk so that it can be used as a boot disk and file systems can be created on it. OS/2, NT, Windows 95, Linux, and other Unix versions all have this command or something similar.
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FDISK

A DOS/Windows utility that is used to partition a hard disk, which is necessary before high-level formatting. See format program.
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References in periodicals archive ?
If this is a brand new installation, use FDISK to partition C: and create a D: and possibly and E: drive.
Potentially dangerous files (e.g., DEBUG.EXE, SUBST.EXE, FDISK.EXE) should be erased from all of the hard disks'\DOS directories.
One sure way of getting rid of it is to low-level format the hard disk, run FDISK to re-establish the Partition Table, then high-level format.
It hadles drives partitioned with the DOS FDISK program with no problem.
With my operating system disk still in drive A, I ran the DOS FDISK command from the A[greater than] prompt.