convulsion

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Related to Febrile convulsions: Febrile seizure

convulsion,

sudden, violent, involuntary contraction of the muscles of the body, often accompanied by loss of consciousness. It is not known what causes the abnormal impulses from the brain that result in convulsive seizures, since the disturbance may arise in normal brain tissue as well as in diseased or injured tissue. Convulsions may occur in such conditions as epilepsy, poisoning, high fever (especially in young children), disturbances of calcium or phosphorus metabolism, alkalosis, diabetes, oxygen insufficiency, and a low blood-sugar content, as well as in local irritation or injury of the brain. Persons undergoing convulsions should be guarded against self-injury (see epilepsyepilepsy,
a chronic disorder of cerebral function characterized by periodic convulsive seizures. There are many conditions that have epileptic seizures. Sudden discharge of excess electrical activity, which can be either generalized (involving many areas of cells in the brain)
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). Otherwise, treatment must be directed to the underlying cause.

convulsion

[kən′vəl·shən]
(medicine)
An episode of involuntary, generally violent muscular contractions, rhythmically alternated with periods of relaxation; associated with many systematic and neurological diseases.

convulsion

a violent involuntary contraction of a muscle or muscles
References in periodicals archive ?
Health visitors have contributed towards collecting national data regarding febrile convulsions and providing support to the families for some time (Paul and Gupta, 2011; Verity, 1985).
The cause of febrile convulsions is not known, although the most common sources of the accompanying fever are viral illness or ear infection.
Observations on the role of vasopressin in febrile convulsions. In P.
Clinical studies suggest that febrile convulsions in early childhood do not have adverse effects on behavior, scholastic performance or neurological development.
The study compared diazepam with a placebo in 406 children who had previously had at least one febrile convulsion. The drug was started at the first sign of fever and given every 8 hours until 24 hours after temperature returned to normal.
Millichap JG: Febrile Convulsions. New York, Macmillan, 1968
Immediately snapping into action, Suzanne recognised that the one-year-old was suffering a febrile convulsion.
Rec urrence risk after a first febrile convulsion. Saudi Med J 2001; 22:254-8.
A seizure is a paroxysmal event caused by abnormal electrical discharge inside the brain.1 Febrile convulsion; twice as common in boys as in girls is one of the most common type of seizure occurring in children between 5 months and 6 years of age accounting for 30% of all seizures in children.23 This is an age dependent response of the immature brain to fever in children4 who do not have an intracranial infection metabolic disturbance or history of afebrile seizures.5
They suggested extraintestinal spread of rotavirus at an early phase of rotavirus infection with systemic symptoms, including high fever and febrile convulsions. Similarly, in our study, 6 patients were diagnosed with febrile seizures related to rotavirus infection because the results of all the studies on infection focus were negative except for rotavirus gastroenteritis.
Prophylactic administration of paracetamol to reduce fever or febrile convulsions after vaccination in infants can result in reduced antibody responses, according to a new study.
LITTLE was known about the needs of children and parents with epilepsy until Anne Sweeney completed a study into febrile convulsions 15 years ago.