seizure

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seizure

Pathol a sudden manifestation or recurrence of a disease, such as an epileptic convulsion
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Seizure

 

a pathological neuropsychic state that arises in an abrupt fitlike manner. Seizures frequently take the form of convulsions or other involuntary movements accompanied by clouding of consciousness. This stage is later replaced by a deep pathological sleep or stupor. Epilepsy, hysteria, and diseases of the brain can produce seizures. Seizures may occur in the form of a sudden relaxation of muscle tone (cataplectic seizure) or a sudden falling asleep (narcoleptic seizure). The term “seizure” is also used in the broader sense of paroxysm.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

seizure

[′sē·zhər]
(medicine)
The sudden onset or recurrence of a disease or an attack.
Specifically, an epileptic attack, fit, or convulsion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, this study might inadvertently include children and adolescents with febrile seizures. However, because febrile seizures usually occur in children aged 6 months-5 years (7), limiting analyses to children and adolescents aged 6-17 years should have excluded almost all children with febrile seizures.
While the pathogenesis is unknown, it may be related to prior infection or febrile seizures as a child.
Several animal models have been developed to investigate the pathogenesis of febrile seizures and their consequences [16, 17].
The relationship between paraclinical findings of first febrile seizure and recurrence of seizure.
From DNHR we obtained information on parental diagnosis of epilepsy and febrile seizure, maternal diagnosis of preeclampsia/eclampsia (ICD-8: 637.03-637.19 and ICD-10: O14-O15.0) and diabetes (iCD-8: 249.00-250.09 and ICD-10: E10.0-E14.9 and O24-O24.9) and child diagnosis of cerebral palsy (ICD-8: 343.99 and 344.99 and ICD-10: G80-80.9) and congenital malformations (ICD-8: 740.99-759.99 and ICD10: Q00-Q99).
"Febrile seizures associated with a vaccine can decrease parent and provider confidence in vaccine safety," the pediatrician noted.
Serum PCT, CRP, and cytokines were measured at the second phase of AESD (before treatment) and onset of complex febrile seizures. In AESD, the changes in PCT and CRP levels during the follow-up period were measured.
Ojha and Aryal reported fever with seizures in 75.5% of cases with febrile seizures as the most common etiology [20].
The febrile seizure is quite common in childhood but still it is extremely frightening, anxiety provoking and emotionally disturbing in those parents who witness the episode1.
Childhood vaccines and febrile seizures. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccine-safety/concerns/febrile-seizures.html.
GABAergic excitation after febrile seizures induces ectopic granule cells and adult epilepsy.
In our study the main cause of febrile seizure was viral fever among cases followed by respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infection and gluteal abscess with similar kind of findings noticed in Seema Pravin Soni et al.