Felsenmeer

felsenmeer

[′felz·ən‚mer]
(geology)
A flat or gently sloping veneer of angular rock fragments occurring on moderate mountain slopes above the timber line.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Felsenmeer

 

vast placers of blocks of rock on the flat surfaces of mountain peaks, located above the treeline. They form as the result of the processes of frost weathering together with the phenomena of solifluction under conditions of a severe continental climate and the development of permafrost rock.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This mineralization can be traced for over 500 metres in outcrop and felsenmeer. These samples have been prepped and transported for assay.
C., Courchesne, F., Stockli, L., Macpherson, G., and Finkel, R., 2004, Felsenmeer persistence through glacial periods in the Torngat and Kaumajet Mountains, Quebec-Labrador, as determined by soil weathering and cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating: Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, v.
A Pionjar "plugger" and ammonium nitrate were used to blast craters 0.6-1 m deep in the thin felsenmeer so that the bedrock could be sampled and assayed.
The fortuitous location of the vertical Eclipse drill holes plus controlled collection of appropriate felsenmeer enabled Lynn to identify a number of distinct lithologic intervals and several markers in the Upper Thumb Mountain Formation.
1977 'Tors, felsenmeer, and glaciation in northern Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island' Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 14, 2817-2823
Exposure ages on felsenmeer summits are consistent with higher abundances of gibbsite found in summit soils relative to soils in tills and valley floors.
Hills have distinctive banding, based on slope and water, from hillside, dry tots and talus cones, to felsenmeer (stone ponds), flat areas of frost-shattered rock, and stone circles, down to moist and peaty areas of pingos and ice polygons.
The absence of outcrop, apart from man-made exposures, was partially compensated for by frost-heaved boulders and slabs of bedrock (felsenmeer), which are present as float in unglaciated areas.