feminist theory

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feminist theory

a theory (see also FEMINISM) which, with the political and social changes of the 1960s and 70s, has challenged traditional conceptions of femininity and GENDER. As Humm (1989) points out, feminist theory ‘both challenges, and is shaped by the academy and society’. It has been, above all, characteristic of the explosion of recent theories, including the work of Hélène CIXOUS, Kate Millet (1970), Juliet Mitchell (1974), Sheila Rowbotham (1973) and many more, that these theories ‘describe the historical, psychological, sexual, and racial experiences of women’, not just academically, but as an indication of ‘how feminism can be a source of power’. Because of this, tensions have existed between feminist theory and sociology, especially given that it has challenged the fact that much sociology has been a sociology of men, stating mens viewpoints. But feminist theory, in so far as it is not always in itself sociology, has contributed to an important reconstruction of sociological perspectives in many areas.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
One can only wish for a feminist analysis and critique of the entire range of organizational and managerial communication theory and practice.
Great steps have been taken in recent years in the fields of the feminist analysis of Russian literature, and the study of Russian women writers, particularly thanks to Catriona Kelly's enormously important A History of Russian Women's Writing, 1820-1992 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994), the invaluable dictionary from Ledkovsky, Rosenthal and Zirin (A Bio-Bibliographical Guide to Russian Women Writers (2 vols, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1994), and Rosalind Marsh's work.
Roberta Hamilton writes her book as an expert who understands both Canadian society and feminist analysis. Although the book is identified by its author as an introductory one it offers perspectives and insight that more sophisticated readers will find valuable.
Her most recent books are Family, Freedom and Faith: Building Community Today (Westminster John Knox, 1996) and Religious Imagination and the Body: A Feminist Analysis (Oxford University Press, 1994).
This invites a reconsideration of Grant's claim that a clean break with the core concepts is both feasible and necessary and that the move to gender as the focus of feminist analysis constitutes just such a break.
Cultural Diversity contains four essays: a comparative study of Spanish American and Brazilian literature; thoughts on the scholarly discussion of Latin American gay culture (reflections that occurred to Foster since publishing his 1991 Gay and Lesbian Themes in Latin American Writing); a detailed feminist analysis of Maria Elena Walsh's writing for children; and a survey of Argentine Jewish dramatists.
Before undertaking an analysis, I obtained Larsen's consent, an element I consider central to a feminist analysis of works of living composers.
In the early 1970s I became converted to the feminist analysis, and slowly a surprising thing began to happen.
She begins by laying out the common feminist analysis of gender and beauty standards focused on women's pressures to conform and perform, and poses the question of how masculinity became compatible with and articulated through such pursuits.
One contributor traces the backlash against feminist analysis of men's violence and challenges the gender-neutral language that hides and perpetuates the problem.
The author focuses strongly on Western feminist analysis, with mixed results.
We produced a feminist analysis of the G20 and Harper's Maternal Health Initiative.