fenestration

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fenestration

1. Architecture the arrangement and design of windows in a building
2. Med a surgical operation to restore hearing by making an artificial opening into the labyrinth of the ear

Fenestration

The design and placement of windows, and other exterior openings in a building.

fenestration

[‚fen·ə′strā·shən]
(architecture)
The arrangement of openings, especially windows, in the wall of a building.
(biology)
A transparent or windowlike break or opening in the surface.
The presence of windowlike openings.

fenestration

The arrangement and design of windows in a building.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present article reports a case series of 2 cases of apical fenestration in necrotic immature permanent teeth associated with apical periodontitis and mucosal breakdown where the soft and hard tissue defects were successfully treated by orthodontic correction of abnormal tooth root position that eventually led to closure of fenestration followed by regenerative endodontic management of immature root apex with apical periodontitis.
Two commonly discussed localized gingival defects include the gingival dehiscence and fenestration.
Interestingly, CD34 immunostaining highlighted blood vessels within fibrotic and fibroblast-rich stromal fenestrations, whereas there were no blood vessels in cystic and edematous/hyalinized stromal fenestrations (Figure 3).
Atypical facial pain related to apical fenestration and overfilling.
Transcatheter closure of fontan fenestrations using the Amplatzer septal occluder: initial experience and follow-up.
1,4-7) To the best of our knowledge, only 15 cases of IJV fenestration have been reported in the literature, (7-9) and no case of a double fenestration of the same IJV has ever been reported until now.
The procedure is safe and entails less down time than the alternatives, which include open surgical cyst fenestration, hepatic dissection, and percutaneous sclerotherapy, said Dr.
Next, a 3D printer generates a template of the diseased section of the patient's aorta, which is then used by surgeons to create fenestrations in the endograft.
In this case, the granulation tissue grew through the fenestrations, obliterated the tracheal lumen, and tethered the tube to the trachea itself.