Fenian


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Related to Fenian: Fenian Brotherhood

Fenian

(formerly) a member of an Irish revolutionary organization founded in the US in the 19th century to fight for an independent Ireland
References in periodicals archive ?
Alone and isolated in quiet region of the country, he was far away from his political connections in Ireland as well as from the Fenians active in cities along the East Coast.
"Mr Peat began shouting and swearing at the male and called him a 'Fenian c***' before threatening to 'do him in'.
Bert Main travelled to London and bought Songster at auction along with a second horse, Fenian, the war horse of Squadron Sergeant Major Harry Poole.
If there ever was a place where a weary traveler would we welcomed, it would be Fenian's Pub.
"We are the Fenian Brotherhood, skilled in the arts of war, And we're going to fight for Ireland, the land we adore, Many battles we have won, along with the boys in blue, And we'll go and capture Canada, for we've nothing else to do." --Fenian soldier's song
As a member of the Fenian Brotherhood, an organization of Irish-American nationalists formed in the United States, he had already led two incursions into British North America, with the objective of seizing some real estate and a major city or two, and then ransoming it in exchange for an independent Irish republic.
These include the centenary of the burial of the Fenian, Jerimiah O'Donovan Rossa, at Glasnevin cemetery on August 1, 1915 which is most famous for Patrick Pearse's graveside oration where he stated "the fools, the fools, the fools!--They have left us our Fenian dead, and while Ireland holds these graves, Ireland unfree shall never be at peace." The emergence of Pearse as a leading figure in the advanced nationalist cause marked the beginning of a radicalization of Irish politics that would culminate with the Easter Rising in Dublin in 1916.
Best known for the graveside oration by Padraig Pearse, the Fenian's burial on August 1, 1915, is widely regarded as a rallying cry for republicanism and armed struggle against British rule in Ireland.
Sim also considers the impact of the Fenian movement in the context of the American Civil War, a subject that has been much examined.
Steward (Mayo Clinic Development Office) and McGovern (history, Kennesaw State University) draw on previously unavailable primary sources to chart the rise and fall of the Fenian Brotherhood movement, started by Irish immigrants living in North America and the UK, and the related movement in Dublin called the Irish Republican Brotherhood.
FEAST DAY OF ST LUCY 1867: Irish Republican Brotherhood (Fenian) bombers blew up the outer wall of London's Clerkenwell prison in an attempt to rescue a jailed colleague: 12 people in nearby housing died.