genie

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genie:

see jinnijinni
, feminine jinniyah
, plural jinn
, in Arabic and Islamic folklore, spirit or demon endowed with supernatural power. In ancient belief the jinn were associated with the destructive forces of nature.
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genie

1. (in fairy tales and stories) a servant who appears by magic and fulfils a person's wishes
2. another word for jinni

Genie

An online information and bulletin board service that closed its doors at the end of 1999, much to the dismay of its many users, some of whom were still chatting when the plug was pulled. Genie (General Electric Network for Information Exchange) was set up as a joint venture between GE and Ameritech in 1985, and in time was acquired by Yovelle Renaissance Corporation and then by IDT in the mid-1990s. Its roundtable discussions, chat lines, games and Internet access attracted a niche of science fiction aficionados as well as horror and fantasy writers. The growth of other online services affected Genie's traffic, which in those early days, peaked at some 400,000 users. See online service. See also Jini.
References in periodicals archive ?
Social workers who rescued her called her a feral child and thought she'd have to live the rest of her life in a nursing home, but a family that had been hoping for a daughter adopted her.
I feel compelled to work hard, said the teen actress at a recent press conference for media's Hanggang Makita Kang Muli, where she portrays a feral child confined in a dark room for almost her entire life.
There's also Wild Girl by John Retallack about a feral child from 18th century France and the Count and Countess who try to civilise her.
This is the question Carol Fenlon posed herself when working on Consider the Lilies, the story of a feral child that recently won the Impress Prize for New Writers.
The girl, who has been dubbed "Mowgli" because of similarities with the feral child protagonist from Rudyard Kipling's "The Jungle Book," does not speak any language or write, so authorities have not been able to ask her about her identity or how long she was living in the wild.
Sue Berelowitz spoke out in her role as Deputy Children's Commissioner and painted a picture of a nation in which feral child rapists run riot.