Richthofen, Ferdinand, Baron von

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Richthofen, Ferdinand, Baron von

(fĕr`dēnänt bärōn` fən rĭkht`hōfən), 1833–1905, German geographer, geologist, and traveler. He took part in a Prussian expedition in E Asia (1860–62), worked as a geologist in W United States (1862–68), then made several exploring journeys in China and Japan (1868–72). His geographical, geological, economic, and ethnological findings in China were embodied in three volumes and an atlas (1877–85); three posthumous volumes appeared in 1911 and 1912. He was professor at the universities of Bonn (1875–83), Leipzig (1883–86), and Berlin (from 1886) and was the founder and the first director (1902–5) of the Institut für Meereskunde, Berlin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Silk Road was the name given in 1877 by the German geographer Ferdinand von Richthofen to the ancient network of trade routes linking China to central and western Asia, India and the Mediterranean region.
Though the historical network of trade routes was discovered by the Chinese Han Dynasty (130 BC - 220 AD), the terms 'Silk Routes' or 'Silk Road' became common among historians only in late 19th century; they were coined by the German geographer Ferdinand von Richthofen who referred to them as ' Seidenstrasse' (silk road) or 'seidenstrassen' (silk routes) in 1877.
While China has long been the eastern terminus of the Silk Road, the term die Seidenstrasse was actually coined by German geographer Ferdinand von Richthofen in 1877.
When German geographer Baron Ferdinand von Richthofen coined the term 'Silk Road' in 1877 to depict the 2,000-year-old East-West trade artery built on the exchange of Arabian stallions and fine fabrics, he could never have imagined that 137 years later one in every three new cars in China would be fuelled by Middle East oil.
German historian Ferdinand von Richthofen coined which name for an ancient trade route?
Baron Ferdinand von Richthofen was his uncle, a renowned traveller, geographer and scientist.
Beginning in the second half of the 19th century, mining opportunities drew many westerners like Ferdinand von Richthofen, Herbert Hoover, T.