alcoholic beverage

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Related to Fermented drink: Kombucha

alcoholic beverage

[‚al·kə′hȯl·ik ′bev·rij]
(food engineering)
A potable preparation containing ethyl alcohol.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of the whey concentration on pH (circles) and total acidity (square) of a fermented drink prepared whole milk (filled symbols) and skim milk (empty symbols).
Around 50ml of the fermented drink formulations were offered in plastic cups, in a balanced and monadic way, for a panel of 21 untrained tasters, chosen according to the availability.
Kefir, a traditional fermented drink widely consumed in eastern Europe as a health food, has been shown in these studies that it inhibits the growth of allergen-linked antibody immunoglobulin E (IgE).
The company describes it as a "substantially non-alcoholic" fermented drink.
Surrounded by maguey fields, Villa is also the place to sample pulque, a fermented drink made from the sap of the maguey.
The researchers collected samples of unprocessed maize and sorghum from each person's home, as well as prepared foods including phutu (cooked milled maize), amahewu (a nonalcoholic fermented gruel-like drink made from maize), and isizulu (an alcoholic fermented drink made from maize and sorghum).
It's the root of a vegetable that is eaten or made into a fermented drink in the Peruvian Andes, where it has been cultivated for more than 2,000 years.
Pulque was very important in pre-Columbian cultures and until recently it was the main fermented drink consumed by peasants in central Mexico, but now two drinks distilled from agave (40% alcohol) are better known--tequila and mescal.
Other beverage options included smoothies; fresh-pressed orange juice; and kombucha, a fermented drink of sweetened black or green tea often presented as a functional food.
Mead is a fermented drink made with honey, water and yeast that has been widely drunk at various times in human history.
Puerto Rico, Jamaica and Cuba were soon settled by the Spanish and by 1625, Brazil - under the Portuguese - was supplying most of Europe's sugar, using enslaved African workers and supplying them with a fermented drink, garapa doida (crazy sugar-cane juice).