Ferments


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Ferments

 

cultures of microorganisms that cause fermentation and that are introduced into a natural substrate (milk, a mixture of flour and water, and grape juice), mainly in the production of food items. Pure cultures of bacteria (mainly lactic-acid bacteria), yeasts, and mold fungi are used as ferments. The microorganisms present in the ferment reproduce in the substrate, causing lactic-acid, propionic-acid, or alcoholic fermentation and forming aromatic organic compounds. Ferments are used to produce sour milk, acidophilus milk, koumiss, kefir, butter, several varieties of cheese, grape wine, and sour bread, as well as for the ensilage of fodder that is hard to ensile.

References in periodicals archive ?
In their book Miso, Tempeh, Natto & Other Tasty Ferments, Kirsten and Christopher Shockey argue that fermented foods are not only good for us, but alsoa"a"because they are sustainable and nutrient-rich -- good for the planet.
While we think of radishes as having strong flavors, in ferments they act as a base for other flavors you dream up.
Fermented foods "have phenomenal benefits in your overall wellness," gushes Dr.
The final six chapters of this book, Part Four, suggest 84 ways to use ferments for breakfast, snacks, lunch, happy hour, dinner, and ...
Fermented foods and beverages have heterogeneity of traditions and cultural preferences found in the different geographical areas, where they are produced.
The values of pH were significantly lower in the NF-must but despite of the high total acidity in this initial inoculum, the values decreased significantly for both ferments during the fermentation.
Glucose and xylose can be fermented separately, but it's a costly process.
The extracted juice is filtered and transferred to tanks where it ferments with water and natural or commercial yeast for about seven days.
Currently, ethanol is produced when yeast ferments the glucose, a form of sugar, contained in food crops such as cane sugar, corn, and other starch-rich grains.
Shelf life depends on the vegetable, but pepper ferments can last unrefrigerated for a year or more in anaerobic conditions, as long as the ferment is sealed and not in active use.
The process of making fermented tofu at home involves allowing unrefrigerated tofu to be exposed to bacteria in the air for a week or more so that it ferments.
Arguably, salt-free ferments are more biodiverse, but this diversity often results in mushy textures.