Ferragus

Ferragus

the Portuguese giant who took the empress Bellisant under his care. [Br. Lit.: “Valentine and Orson” in Brewer Handbook, 364]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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In the preface to Ferragus (1833), which introduces the story of the Treize, Balzac insistently describes his band of men through references to fiction: though they have led a "vie secrete, curieuse, autant que peut l'Etre le plus noir des romans," he writes, "ces treize hommes sont restes inconnus, quoique tous aient realise les plus bizarres idees que suggere a l'imagination la fantastique puissance faussement attribuee aux Manfred, aux Faust, aux Melmoth" (5: 787-88).
Streets evoke human and dramatic qualities, as proposed by Honore de Balzac with regard to the human quality and the physiognomy of Paris (see Ferragus), but they are composed of individual buildings.
L'armada di Franz Zeise (1947), Ferragus di Balzac (1947), Saffo di
He pulled a quote that Maurice had cited from Balzac's Ferragus for use in his article "Paris in Ut-Mineur," which he published on March 8, 1931 in the Paris edition of the Chicago Tribune--under the byline of Alfred Perles.
Turning in the next section of the book to Balzac, Nesci uses the contrasting heroines of Ferragus, Ida Gruget and Clemence Desmarets as a means of exploring Balzac's modern aesthetic, which she sees as linked to the depiction of a haunted and haunting Paris which is decidedly gendered.
It is not, however, to the Scenes de la vie de province that one would most naturally turn in illustration of such a view of the Balzacian text but to the openings of, say, Le Pere Goriot, Ferragus, or La Fille aux yeux d'or to confine oneself to texts from the same period as La Vieille Fille.
Ferragus), qui commet la faute irreparable d'aimer son mari, excite la jalousie de ceux qui la voient et dechaine ainsi une serie de complots qui finissent par la tuer.
Balzac's 1833 novel Ferragus exemplifies on several levels this problem of readability, by which I mean the ability to decipher and interpret, and to produce a coherent meaning.