ferroelectricity

(redirected from Ferroelectric materials)

ferroelectricity

[¦fe·rȯ·i′lek·tris·əd·ē]
(solid-state physics)
Spontaneous electric polarization in a crystal; analogous to ferromagnetism.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 26, 2019-: Ferroelectric Materials Market - A comprehensive study by Key Players: Sakai Chemical, Nippon Chemical, Ferro, Fuji Titanium
The ferroelectric materials are used in sensors, actuators, memories, and energy harvesting devices.
Ferroelectric materials are keenly studied at FLEET (the ARC Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies) for their potential use in low-energy electronics, 'beyond CMOS' technology.
The coupling between the ferroelectric and ferromagnetic property distributions can be through the coupling of the spontaneous polarization ([P.sub.s]) of ferroelectric materials and the spontaneous ferromagnetic magnetization ([m.sub.s]), but this magnetoelectric coupling does not happen automatically [15].
Thin films of other ferroelectric materials (i.e., (Ba, Sr)Ti[O.sub.3] [61-63] and Pb(Zr, Ti)[O.sub.3] [63, 64]) were applied by Zhu and coworkers for detection of hydrogen gas.
Lately, because of the toxicity of lead and lead compounds, the interest in ferroelectric materials without lead has grown considerably.
Cao, "Losses in ferroelectric materials," Materials Science and Engineering: R: Reports, vol.
Since the discovery of ceramic ferroelectric materials in 1940, lead and titanates perovskites had been of great interest due to their dielectric and piezoelectric properties [1].
Topics covered include: the synthesis, unique properties and application of magnetic oxide nanomaterials; high permeability and saturation magnetization of certain Mn-Zn Ferrites; synthesis and properties of M-type and Y-type hexaferrites; hydrodermal synthesis, characterization and properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide nonoparticles; theory and application of spin-torque nano-oscillator; ferroelectric superlattices with polarization perpendicular to the interface surface within the context of Landau-Ginzburg Theory; properties and an application of Ni doped Co-Zn nanoferrites; flexoelectricity in nanocscale dielectrics; and ferroelectric materials for high temperature piezoelectric applications.
Brydson explains that gaining access to vibrational signatures associated with chemical bonds can help with the understanding of structure-property relationships in thermoelectric materials for conversion of waste heat into electricity, ferroelectric materials which can convert between mechanical energy and electrical energy, such as piezomaterials and sonar, as well as surface reactions on catalytic materials.