Ferrophosphorus

ferrophosphorus

[¦fe·rō′fäs·fə·rəs]
(metallurgy)
A by-product formed in the heating of iron, phosphate rock, silica, and coke; this alloy is used to increase fluidity in steel casting.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ferrophosphorus

 

a ferroalloy whose principal components are iron and phosphorus (2–25 percent P). Ferrophosphorus is either produced in blast furnaces, where apatites or phosphorites are reduced in the presence of iron ore or iron turnings, or is obtained as a by-product from the electrothermic production of white phosphorus. The alloy is used in the smelting of structural steel and cast iron.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.