Ferrophosphorus

ferrophosphorus

[¦fe·rō′fäs·fə·rəs]
(metallurgy)
A by-product formed in the heating of iron, phosphate rock, silica, and coke; this alloy is used to increase fluidity in steel casting.

Ferrophosphorus

 

a ferroalloy whose principal components are iron and phosphorus (2–25 percent P). Ferrophosphorus is either produced in blast furnaces, where apatites or phosphorites are reduced in the presence of iron ore or iron turnings, or is obtained as a by-product from the electrothermic production of white phosphorus. The alloy is used in the smelting of structural steel and cast iron.

References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2 Phosphate Rock Distribution Pattern (K mt) 1994e 1993 1992 1991 Wet Process Phosphoric Acid 37,460 33,664 37,790 35,895 Single superphosphate 20 50 23 47 Triple superphosphate 490 450 501 395 Direct Application 0 0 0 0 Elemental Phosphorus 2,800 2,850 3,076 3,288 Ferrophosphorus 0 0 0 0 Total 40,770 37,014 41,390 39,625 Exports 3,350 3,575 3,723 5,082 Grand Total 44,120 40,589 45,113 44,707 Sources: USBM and Fertecon Research Centre Estimates (e) Estimated
Table 2 Phosphate Rock Distribution Pattern (K mt) 1990 1991 1992 1993(e) Wet Process Phosphoric Acid 38,409 35,895 37,790 34,050 Single superphosphate 2,383 47 23 50 Triple superphosphate 429 395 501 450 Direct Application 3 0 0 0 Elemental Phosphorus 2,256 3,288 3,076 2,950 Ferrophosphorus 36 0 0 0 Total 43,516 39,625 41,390 37,500 Exports 6,238 5,082 3,723 3,600 Grand Total 49,754 44,707 45,113 41,100 Table 4 U.
Ferrophosphorus, a byproduct of electric-furnace reduction of phosphate ores, contains vanadium and chromium.