Preservation

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Preservation

Protection of a material from physical deterioration due to natural elements or human activity; by various technical, scientific, and craft techniques

building preservation

The process of applying measures to maintain and sustain the existing materials, integrity, and form of a building, including its structure and building artifacts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends that oncologists routinely discuss the possibility of reproductive loss and offer the option of fertility preservation for patients of reproductive age, only 61% of the California women reported that their oncologist mentioned that their treatment carried a risk of infertility.
Ethical issues in fertility preservation for adolescent cancer survivors: oocyte and ovarian tissue cryopreservation.
Unfortunately, fertility preservation services are rarely offered or even discussed with the patient before starting cancer therapy.
has organized the Fertility Preservation Network to educate oncology professionals and caretakers, as well as provide much needed cryopreservation services.
However, the semen of oligoasthenteratozoospermic (OAT) men often contains a very limited number of spermatozoa and they are always candidates for sperm freezing and fertility preservation in future.
The site offers over 80 fact sheets and booklets on wide-ranging and important topics, including age and fertility, diagnostic testing, ART, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), weight loss, single embryo transfer, progesterone, endometriosis, fibroids, adoption, state insurance laws, counseling same-sex couples undergoing ART, and cancer and fertility preservation.
The vast majority of respondents (81%) were unaware of any patient organizations that have educational materials and information on oncology fertility preservation.
In the present review it was aimed to provide an overview of current fertility-preserving treatment options and the future of fertility preservation.
The company, which employs approximately 150 people, supplies fertility treatment, genetic diagnosis and screening techniques, as well as associated fertility preservation procedures.
Reproductive medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, infertility, andrology, and other specialists from the US, Europe, and Middle East cover physiology; aspects of infertility, including disorders of ovulation, male factors, endometriosis-associated infertility, unexplained infertility, and emotional factors; and assisted reproductive technology, including insemination, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, treatment of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, cryopreservation, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, molecular biology, fertility preservation in female cancer patients, non-obstructive azoospermia, the role of fibroids, IVF in transplant and cardiac patients, and religious aspects associated with Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
Reports also come from Spain and other countries about fertility preservation, prevention of cell aging, effects of passive smoke exposure on fertility, daylight changes and environment effects.