ferulic acid

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ferulic acid

[fə′rül·ik ′as·əd]
(organic chemistry)
C10H10O4 A compound widely distributed in small amounts in plants, having two isomers: the cis form is a yellow oil, and the trans form is obtained from water solutions as orthorhombic crystals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the types of genes involved in the degradation of grass polysaccharides, CE 1 feruloyl esterases (FAE) (EC 3.1.1.73) are absent in the genomes of P.
Wang, Wheat bran feruloyl oligosaccharides enhance the antioxidant activity of rat plasma, Food Chemistry: 123(2), 472-476 (2010).
(2006) Enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw for bioethanol production by a combined cellulase xylanase and feruloyl esterase treatment.
The newly developed process incorporates ferulie acid into soybean oil, producing water- resistant feruloyl soy gylcerides capable of absorbing UVA and LWB light.
Scientists have developed a new method for converting soybean oil into a highly effective bio-based sunscreen active ingredient, called feruloyl soy glycerides (FSG), which does not carry the potential health concerns of ingredients in some existing sunscreens.
These cross-links involve oxidative coupling of polysaccharides and glycoproteins by phenollic groups of feruloyl or p-coumaroyl or isodityrosine bridges, and of the monolignols (Cassab & Varner 1988).
Xylanases (endo-1,4-beta-xylanase; EC 3.2.1.8) are glycosidases which randomly cleave internal [beta]-1,4-D-xylosidic linkages of xylan [4], a bioheteropolymer consisting of D-xylose homopolymer backbone that can be substituted to diverse degrees with glucuronosyl, 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronopyranosyl, [alpha]-L-arabinofuranosyl, acetyl, feruloyl, and/or p-coumaroyl residues and is one of the most abundant polysaccharides in nature [5-7].
The signal around 1720 [cm.sup.-1] corresponding to the C=O functional group is a characteristic peak of ester-linked acetyl, feruloyl, and [rho]-coumaroyl groups between hemicelluloses and lignin [22].
Xylan degrading enzymes include those that degrade the main chain which are endo-[beta]-1,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) and [beta]-xylosidase (EC 3.2.1.37); and side chain-cleaving enzymes that include [alpha]-glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.139), [alpha]-L-arabinofuranosidase (EC 3.2.1.55), acetylxylan esterase (EC 3.1.1.72) and feruloyl esterase (3.1.1.73) (Biely 1985; Biely 2003; Ryabovaa et al.
Ruel et al., "Redirection of the phenylpropanoid pathway to feruloyl malate in Arabidopsis mutants deficient for cinnamoyl-CoA reductase 1," Planta, vol.
However, contradictory results had also been reported for free curcumin solution which exhibited a prominent peak at 350 nm and was attributed to the n-[[pi].sup.*] transition of the feruloyl unit of curcumin [21, 22].
Although feruloyl esterases can cleave diferulate cross-links in soluble xylans or simple model substrates (Faulds et al., 2003: Garcia-Conesa et al., 1999a), there is no evidence that these enzymes break a significant proportion of cross-links within lignified cell walls: therefore, they are currently of limited value for improving cell wall degradability.