Feste


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Feste: Twelfth night

Feste

playful fool. [Br. Lit.: Twelfth Night]
See: Clowns
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second day of this year's Feste will feature a wide range of international performers who will entertain the crowds across the Cathedral Quarter, St Peter's Quarter and intu Derby.
Feste the jester is played by several actors as a "group character" that has become the Bowie-world band, The Barren Rascals.
Equally outstanding were the six soloists, notably bass Greg Skidmore's declamatory zest, tenor Bradley Smith's vocal athleticism in the Magnificat's 'Deposuit' - a telling contrast to the romantic intensity of his duet with Martha McLorinan - and soprano Katie Trethewey's luminously passionate 'Komm in mein Herzenshaus' in Ein feste Burg.
"I said, 'Well, does that mean paralysis and there's nowhere to go?'" Feste recalled.
Of the three Feste buskers Chris Buckle stood out as a fantastic singer, as did Matt Pettifor as twin Sebastian, and the choir, which featured pupils from King Edward VI's School, Lichfield, and Lichfield Garrick's Youth Theatre, must also be praised.
The third was "Feste Romane," premiered by Arturo Toscanini and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in 1929.
Edmund continued "Todd James, who plays Feste, delivers numerous beautifully sung songs.
Todd James as Olivia's fool, Feste, succeeded in bringing out the veiled wisdom, puns and double-entendres of some of Shakespeare's cleverest writing and proved a fine balladeer throughout, while Andrew Keay coped well with the very different demands of Sebastian and Sir Andrew Aguecheek.
Violins play as Feste (Tony Bell) steps forward, holding a large bottle with a model ship in it, which he tips up and down, swirls to the right and left.
Shana Feste piles on cliches and contrivances like a club sandwich, stacking poorly sketched characters atop stilted dialogue and woeful performances, so it is unwieldy and hard to swallow.
Unlike Franco Zeffirelli's notoriously over-the-top 1981 filmization of Scott Spencer's novel, Shana Feste's Endless Love" seems less a misguided adaptation than a deliberate, flat-out rewrite.
Writer/director Shana Feste has a grasp on teenagers -- even ones being played by actors in their mid-20s.