Feynman


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Feynman

Richard. 1918--88, US physicist, noted for his research on quantum electrodynamics; shared the Nobel prize for physics in 1965
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His father's early training was invaluable to Feynman in his teaching career.
The following is an excerpt from The Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen Scientist (Helix Books/Addison-Wesley Books, (C) 1995 by Michelle Feynman and Carl Feynman.
I still remember Hans Bethe saying to me, "Hey, Feynman. That's pretty interesting, but what's the importance of it?
Playwright Constance Congdon, who covered similar terrain in No Mercy, her 1985 drama about Feynman's famous cohort Robert Oppenheimer, talked with Vandenbroucke about the challenge of writing about the bomb.
The invention that made it possible for these scientists to pocket Feynman's booty was the scanning tunnel microscope, invented in the early '80s as a tool to manipulate atoms.
Richard Feynman made a speech 33 years ago in which he essentially outlined the whole field, and even researchers at the cutting edge today were sort of surprised when they went back and read the speech, and found out that the basic concept had been available for a long time."
It occurred to Feynman one day that after hours of concentrating on physics, it was tiresome to talk about the subject again over dinner.
Although Feynman is remembered as one of the foremost scientists of the century, he is not remembered as one of the pioneers of computing.
Nobel Prize-winning scientist Richard Feynman's memoir, Surely You're Joking, Mr.
"In one of his books, Richard Feynman talked about the enormous effort a scientist has to put into making sure experiments are not compromised."
The Feynman Group recently promoted Joshua Brown to vice president of technology.
London, United Kingdom, December 11, 2013 --(PR.com)-- Freeman Dyson is recognised for demonstrating the equivalence of two formulations of quantum electrodynamics: Richard Feynman's diagrams, and the operator method developed by Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga.