Fianna Fáil

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Fianna Fáil

Fianna Fáil (fēˈənə fäl), Irish political party, organized in 1926 by opponents of the Anglo-Irish treaty of 1921 establishing the Irish Free State and setting up Northern Ireland as part of the United Kingdom. Led by Eamon De Valera, the party gained control of the government in 1932 and pursued a policy of complete political separation from Great Britain. Except for the years 1948–51 and 1954–57, it held power continuously until 1973, when it lost to an alliance of the Fine Gael and Labor parties. Fianna Fáil held power again under Jack Lynch (1977–79) and Charles Haughey (1979–81), but lost once more to the Fine Gael. After a brief return to power under Haughey in 1982, it remained in opposition until 1987, when it once again formed a government under Haughey (after 1989 in coalition with the Progressive Democrats). When scandal forced his resignation in 1992, Albert Reynolds succeeded him, heading a Fianna Fáil–Labor coalition. Reynolds resigned in 1994, and a Fine Gael–Labor coalition came to power. The party returned to power in 1997 under Bertie Ahern, in coalition with the Progressive Democrats until 2009 and with the Greens from 2007 to 2011. When Ahern resigned in 2008, Brian Cowen succeeded him as party leader and prime minister. Micheál Martin became party leader in 2011, when Fianna Fáil placed third in an election held during a financial crisis. The party regained strength in 2016 and placed second, narrowly behind Fine Gael, and narrowly bested Sinn Féin to win a plurality in 2020, when it formed a coalition government with Fine Gael and the Greens and Martin became prime minister.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"This would be a dramatically horrible result for the Fianna Fail party," said Frank Flannery, Fine Gael's deputy director of elections.
THE Irish government was plunged into chaos last night as the junior coalition Green Party pulled out over the resignation of Taoiseach Brian Cowen as leader of the ruling Fianna Fail party. John Gormley, the Green leader and Environment Minister, said his party had lost patience with Fianna Fail and could no longer continue in government.
Cowen's party lost the support of the Green Party, a small but key coalition ally, over the weekend and Cowen himself resigned as leader of the Fianna Fail party.
The MPs said they had lost patience with the uncertainty over the leadership of prime minister Brian Cowen's Fianna Fail party.
quit as leader of his ruling Fianna Fail party last night.
Ireland's Prime Minister Brian Cowen resigned as leader of the ruling Fianna Fail party but said yesterday he would remain as premier until a parliamentary election on March 11.
Brian Cowen, Ireland's Taoiseach (Prime Minister) is facing a no confidence vote by members of his ruling Fianna Fail party for his handling of the country's AC85 billion bailout from the IMF and the European Central Bank.
Opinion polls show support for Cowen and his Fianna Fail party at record lows, while Fine Gael is the most popular party.
Hills report big interest in Ahern following the release of the latest opinion poll, which showed a big five per cent gain for his Fianna Fail party ahead of Thursday's general election.
A CAB investigation eventually saw him jailed for six months after he stepped down from the Fianna Fail party.
Mr Ahern said he had signed his name to letters inviting donations for his Fianna Fail party from various bodies, but he had never asked anyone for a political payment.
As Medb Ruane pointed out, it is no longer the case that Irish voters ask "how high?" when told to jump by the bishops and their allies in the Fianna Fail party. Just as well, considering some of the things the bishops have asked us to support.