fibrinoid

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Related to Fibrinoid necrosis: Coagulative necrosis

fibrinoid

[′fī·brə‚nȯid]
(biochemistry)
A homogeneous, refractile, oxyphilic substance occurring in degenerating connective tissue, as in term placentas, rheumatoid nodules, and Aschoff bodies, and in pulmonary alveoli in some prolonged pneumonitides.
References in periodicals archive ?
4] Extensive crescent formation and fibrinoid necrosis are uncommon findings in fibrillary GN.
C, Trichrome-stained section demonstrating extensive damage to the vascular wall with fibrinoid necrosis.
Fibrinoid necrosis of the choroidal vessels can cause patchy non-perfusion of areas of the choriocapillaris.
In the present study, the glomerulonephritis rat model induced by cBSA was employed, and the parameters of renal function impairment and glomerular lesion were measured, including scrum creatinine (Scr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and endogenous creatinine clearance rate (ECcr), 24-h urine protein, hypercellularity, infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), fibrinoid necrosis, focal and segmental proliferation, and interstitial infiltration.
Histopathology revealed severe fibrinonecrotic enteritis associated with large numbers of gram-negative bacteria, multifocal fibrinoid necrosis in portal arteries, accumulation of fibrin in hepatic sinusoids, myocardial degeneration, and necrosis.
Signs of fibrinoid necrosis, endothelial swelling and nuclear dust were detected.
The resultant classic histopathological findings of pulmonary capillaritis are interstitial erythrocytes, capillary wall fibrinoid necrosis, inter-alveolar septal capillary occlusion, interstitial and alveolar space neutrophils, as well as interalveolar septal fibrin clots.
Placental findings also include fibrinoid necrosis, atherosis of decidual vessels, and intimal thickening.
Microscopy of the specimen again showed a florid granulomatous inflammatory process with areas of fibrinoid necrosis.
Active lesions (Figure 4, A through E) have varying degrees of large subendothelial deposits ("wire loop lesions"), hyaline thrombi, endocapillary cellular proliferation, inflammatory cell infiltration, fibrinoid necrosis with disruption of capillary basement membranes, and cellular crescents that generally have mesangial proliferation.
Microscopically, most of the hemorrhagic foci in the brain consisted of fibrinoid necrosis of the wall of small veins, surrounded by hemorrhagic parenchymal necrosis and a dense annular infiltrate of neutrophils and macrophages (Figure).
Histologic examination of these submucosal nodules revealed the classic appearance of a rheumatoid lesion with central fibrinoid necrosis and peripheral histiocytic palisading (figure 2).