CAP

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Related to Fibrous cap: atheroma, fibrous capsule, Foam cells

cap

1. Sport chiefly Brit
a. an emblematic hat or beret given to someone chosen for a representative team
b. a player chosen for such a team
2. the upper part of a pedestal in a classical order
3. Botany the pileus of a mushroom or toadstool
4. Hunting
a. money contributed to the funds of a hunt by a follower who is neither a subscriber nor a farmer, in return for a day's hunting
b. a collection taken at a meet of hounds, esp for a charity
5. Anatomy
a. the natural enamel covering a tooth
b. an artificial protective covering for a tooth
6. an upper financial limit
7. a mortarboard when worn with a gown at an academic ceremony (esp in the phrase cap and gown)
8. Meteorol
a. the cloud covering the peak of a mountain
b. the transient top of detached clouds above an increasing cumulus

CAP

Common Agricultural Policy: (in the EU) the system for supporting farm incomes by maintaining agricultural prices at agreed levels
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Cap

The top member of any vertical architectural element; often projecting, with a drip for protection from the weather; the coping of a wall, the top of a pedestal or buttress, or the lintel of a door.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

What does it mean when you dream about a cap?

A hat, a cover over an oil well, a snow-capped mountain, a nightcap for sleeping, or a nightcap before bed may all indicate sense of completion of some issue, job well done, or a mission accomplished.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

cap

[kap]
(engineering)
A detonating or blasting cap.
(genetics)
In many eukaryotic messenger ribonucleic acids, the structure at the 5′ end consisting of 7′-methyl-guanosine-pppX, where X is the first nucleotide encoded in the deoxyribonucleic acid; it is added posttranscriptionally.
(mathematics)
The symbol ∩, which indicates the intersection of two sets.
(mining engineering)
A piece of timber placed on top of a prop or post in a mine.
The horizontal section of a set of timber that is used as a support in a mine roadway.

Cap

(astronomy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cap

1. Usually, the topmost member of any vertical architectural element, often projecting, with a drip as protection from the weather, e.g., the coping of a wall, top of a pedestal or buttress, the lintel of a door, etc.
2. A layer of concrete placed over rock in the bottom of foundation excavations to level the exposed surface, prevent its deterioration by weathering, and protect it from other damage.
3. The upper member of a column, pilaster, door cornice, molding, and the like; also called cap trim, wainscot cap, dado cap, chair rail cap, capital.
4. A fitting used to close the top end of a tubular newel.
6. A fitting used to close the end of a pipe.
7. A plane surface which is bonded to the bearing surface of a test specimen during its strength testing to ensure a uniform load distribution.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

CAP

(networking)

CAP

(communications)

CAP

(networking)
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

CAP

(1) (Competitive Access Provider) An organization that competes with the established telecommunications provider in an area.

(2) (Carrierless Amplitude Phase) A type of ADSL service. See DSL.

(3) (CAMEL Application Part) The protocol used to implement CAMEL functions in the GSM system. CAP is the CAMEL counterpart of the INAP protocol and resides at the same level in the SS7 protocol suite. See INAP and CAMEL.

(4) (Central Access Point) An access point that is wired to the local network. In a mesh network, other access points (APs) have a wireless connection to the CAP. See access point.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted that only one calcified inclusion embedded in fibrous cap is considered.
Unstable plaques with thinner fibrous caps and an excess of inflammatory cells in the outer region (47,52,53) are prone to induce acute thrombosis and subsequent cardiac events.
Persistence of thin fibrous cap atheromas can be a cyclic process characterized by rupture of the fibrous cap, thrombosis, thrombus dissolution by fibrinolysis, repair/scarring, and subsequent rupture.
Cyclic stretching, compression, bending, flexion, shear and pressure fluctuations may fatigue and weaken a fibrous cap, causing spontaneous rupture.
In addition, it has been suggested that as a metalloproteinase, the PAPP-A produced by activated macrophages may be involved in degradation of the plaque extracellular matrix with consequent weakening of the fibrous cap. This might produce a more vulnerable plaque that is prone to rupture.
A fibrous cap forms over the lesion, enlarging and restructuring it.
"The dangerous lesions aren't so much the large, advanced ones," says Rifkind, "but smaller, unstable lesions covered by a small fibrous cap."
Fibrous cap was displayed as isointensity in T1-weighted image (T1WI) and hyperintensities in proton density weighted image (PDWI) and T2-weighted image (T2WI), lipid core was displayed as isointensity or slight hyperintensities in T1WI, isointensity, hyperintensities or hypointensity in PDWI, and hypointensity in T2WI.
The plaque was subdivided into a fibrous cap and a necrotic core on the basis of picrosirius red staining for collagen and oil red O staining for lipids, respectively.
Greenberg, who is director of the Arthritis Transiational Registry and Biorepository at New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, is involved in ongoing studies using advanced MRI and PET techniques to visualize and quantify some of the key histologic features of plaque that are most likely to rupture, which he calls "vulnerable plaque." These histologic features include macrophage content, plaque neovascularization, a lipid-rich necrotic core, and a thin fibrous cap.
Plaque instability is associated with a high macrophage content and a thin fibrous cap. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have the capability to degrade the extracellular matrix of the fibrous cap, predisposing to plaque rupture (3).
In contrast with the atheroma volume, increased calcification does not enhance fibrous cap stress in stable or ruptured human coronary atherosclerotic plaques [17].