Fichtelgebirge


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Fichtelgebirge

(fĭkh`təlgəbĭr'gə), mountain knot, in SE Germany, between Bayreuth and the Czech border; rises to 3,447 ft (1,051 m) in Schneeberg peak. The rugged mountains are composed mainly of metamorphic rock. The Erzgebirge, Bohemian Forest, Thuringian Forest, and Franconian Jura radiate from them, and the Saale and Main rivers originate there. The Fichtelgebirge have dense pine forests and are dotted with resorts. The mountains were once rich in a variety of minerals, but now only lignite and iron are found in large quantities. Selb, the chief town of the region, is a major center for porcelain production. Other major industries include cotton textiles, forestry, granite quarrying, and tourism.

Fichtelgebirge

 

a mountain massif in the Federal Republic of Germany. The Fichtelgebirge extend for more than 50 km and form the western tip of the Bohemian Massif. They are composed primarily of schists, which form a plateau at an elevation of approximately 600 m; above this plateau rise rocky granite and gneiss peaks, which rise to an elevation of 1,053 m, at the Schneeberg. Rock streams are found along the slopes. The massif is covered by fir forests and meadows. The population is engaged in cattle raising and the cultivation of rye and potatoes. The Fichtelgebirge are a center for tourism and winter sports.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Germans found that 16 to 20 percent of the nitrate leaving two healthy-looking Fichtelgebirge stands bore air pollution's signature, they report in the Dec.
Indeed, Hedin asserts, unless pollution trends in the United States and elsewhere change, "you could argue that [the difference between them and Fichtelgebirge! is just a matter of time." If atmospheric nitrate can pass unchanged through "even our healthy stands, where no [tree] damage is visible," Schulze observes, "this means we have a process going on in these soils which will cause even more severe damage in the visible future" -- probably the next several decades.
and Morteani, G.: 1994, Geochemistry and petrography of altered rocks and mineralisation: Fichtelgebirge, In: Haslam, H.W.
Though Fichtelgebirge is hardly a household name, its devastation warns of a problem facing timberlands throughout the industrial world.
Though acid rain has received much of the blame for Fichtelgebirge's deterioration, scientists have also considered other agents, including magnesium deficiency, fungi, insects and even weather.
Fichtelgebirge's trees gradually developed serious deficiencies of magnesium, potassium, manganese and iron, particularly in their stems and needles.
Compounding the problem is an unusual abundance of soil ammonium at Fichtelgebirge, according to Schulze's new data.
Locality: The former Brandholz-Goldkronach mining district in the western part of the Fichtelgebirge, Bavaria, Germany.
Comparing the effects of acidic deposition on the chemistry of small streams in the South Island of New Zealand with those in the Fichtelgebirge, F.R.G.
The Barons von Friesen, von Schlotheim and von Seckendorf all built significant collections, and the "great collection" of Baron Friedrich von Lupin (1771-1845) in Volkratshofen was gathered through his own extensive field collecting in France, the Erzgebirge, the Rhone Mountains, the Fichtelgebirge, Transylvania, Bohemia, Sweden, Hungary, the Carpathian Mountains and the Alps.
Joachimsthal, Fichtelgebirge, the Harz Mountains, Allemont, and Darmstadter, among others.