Fictionalism


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fictionalism

 

a subjective idealist philosophical concept that regards human cognition as a system of fictions that are justified in practice but that have no theoretical significance. The concept was given its most complete expression by H. Vaihinger. F. Nietzsche’s view of truth as a useful lie and the pragmatic theory of cognition are close to fictionalism. Fictionalism absolutizes the concepts and methods of thinking used in cognition that have no direct analogues in reality, for example the construction of ideal objects, working hypotheses, and several forms of modeling, and on this basis repudiates the theory of reflection. Fictionalism is a logical conclusion to the positivism of the 19th century; it has had a definite impact on present-day types of positivism.

REFERENCES

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The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In sections on whether nature carves itself, where limits lie, where tools come from, and what mind-dependency depends on, they consider such matters as whether the world is really a world of objects: a note on Quinean ontology, spatial fictionalism: a solution to the grounding problem, the bona fideness of material entities and their boundaries, a conceptual view in the metaphysics of species, the semantics of artifactual words, and Leibniz's principle and psycho-neural identity.
The Will to Make-Believe: Religious Fictionalism, Religious Beliefs, and the Value of Art, ANDREA SAUCHELLI
Both the philosopher and the artist, albeit in radically different ways, acknowledge the value of fictionalism. Both recognize that fictions are essentially what structure our reality.
"The Frege-Geach Problem and Kalderon's Moral Fictionalism." Philosophical Quarterly 59, no.
To resolve the above tension--that Congress must have intentions for legislation to be meaningful but reliably fails to form them--this Article argues that one should accept what philosophers call "fictionalism" about legislative intent.
In contrast, mathematical fictionalism asserts that mathematical sentences purport to be about the abstract world, but the abstract world does not exist, so they are all false.
Badiou, Agamben and Zizek confront deconstructionist fictionalism: they radically challenge those trends in social philosophy that relativize truth (truth-effects).
He understood it as a conglomerate of various predecessors including, among others, the cognitive constructivism of Jean Piaget, the philosophical skepticisim of George Berkeley, the fictionalism of Hans Vaihinger, the transcendental philosophy of Immanuel Kant, and the Renaissance philosophy of Giambattista Vico.
The essays treat the following topics: Nietzsche's views on or relationship to aesthetics (essays 1-3), metaethics, (specifically, non-cognitivism and fictionalism) (essays 4-5), compassion and the self (essays 6-8), and naturalism (essay 9).