Fictionalism


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Fictionalism

 

a subjective idealist philosophical concept that regards human cognition as a system of fictions that are justified in practice but that have no theoretical significance. The concept was given its most complete expression by H. Vaihinger. F. Nietzsche’s view of truth as a useful lie and the pragmatic theory of cognition are close to fictionalism. Fictionalism absolutizes the concepts and methods of thinking used in cognition that have no direct analogues in reality, for example the construction of ideal objects, working hypotheses, and several forms of modeling, and on this basis repudiates the theory of reflection. Fictionalism is a logical conclusion to the positivism of the 19th century; it has had a definite impact on present-day types of positivism.

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In an earlier paper the author argued that deflationism is preferable to fictionalism as an alternative to both traditional realism and eliminativism.
The Frege-Geach Problem and Kalderon's Moral Fictionalism.
9) Fictionalism is the thesis that claims made within some area of discourse are best understood as involving a useful fiction instead of aiming for literal truth.
In contrast, mathematical fictionalism asserts that mathematical sentences purport to be about the abstract world, but the abstract world does not exist, so they are all false.
The topics are a historical overview; model skepticism and modal expressivism; modalism; modal realism; ersatzism; model fictionalism and modal agnosticism; the new modal actualism; necessities, necessary existents, and their bounds.
He understood it as a conglomerate of various predecessors including, among others, the cognitive constructivism of Jean Piaget, the philosophical skepticisim of George Berkeley, the fictionalism of Hans Vaihinger, the transcendental philosophy of Immanuel Kant, and the Renaissance philosophy of Giambattista Vico.
ROSEN, Modal Fictionalism, "Mind" 99 (1990) 401-417.
2009, Fiction and Fictionalism, Routledge, Londres.
At one time the rationale for fictionalism was obvious.
Yet it is clear that pragmatism and fictionalism have much in common, especially in their acknowledgment of the significance of heuristic ideals.