Field Crickets


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Field Crickets

 

various, mostly small, species of non-gregarious grasshoppers.

Field crickets are found in greatest diversity in wilderness areas. Many field crickets are harmful to crops. These pest species include Gomphocerus sibiricus, Chorthippus albomarghinatus, and Pararcyptera microptera in the forest-steppe and steppe zones and Dociostaurus kraussi and Ramburiella turcomana in Middle Asia.

References in periodicals archive ?
Monitoring the flights of field crickets (Gryllus spp.
Phonotaxis in female Ormia ochracea (Diptera: Tachinidae), a parasitoid of field crickets.
Ormia ochracea females are known to parasitize multiple species of field cricket (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) such as Gryllus rubens (Scudder 1902) and G.
In order to quantify song and determine if different songs are used for calling (long-range mate attraction) and courtship (close-range mating interactions), as is commonly the case in field crickets (Alexander 1961; Fitzpatrick & Gray 2001; Walker & Masaki 1989), we recorded a sample of males in the laboratory twice each: once when the male was alone and had been held individually isolated for a minimum period of one week, and once when paired with a female.
The evolution of alternative male reproductive strategies in field crickets.
Singing males of the Texas field cricket, Gryllus texensis (Orthoptera: Gryllidae), are acoustically stalked and parasitized by gravid females of the parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea (Diptera: Tachinidae) (Cade 1975).
Effects of a tachinid parasitoid, Ormia ochracea, on the behavior and reproduction of its male and female field cricket hosts (Gryllus spp.
Though the study focused on field crickets, the findings are likely to be relevant in other insect species and possibly other sections of the animal kingdom.
He added: "The vast majority of studies of insect learning focus on foraging behaviour, and in non-social insects - like field crickets - it is truly a surprise to find that they can change their behaviour based on remembered social information.
In field crickets, males use song as a long-range signal to attract females for mating.
They also showed that male field crickets have larger heads and mouthparts than females, which, according to Judge "makes sense given that female crickets don't fight over mates.
By examining weaponry, the study opened a new avenue by which researchers can understand aggression in field crickets.