Fiesole


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Fiesole

(fyā`zōlā), town (1991 pop. 15,096), Tuscany, central Italy. The villas and gardens of this tourist center are beautifully situated on a hill overlooking the Arno valley and the city of Florence. An ancient Etruscan town called Faesulae, it was enriched with fine buildings by the Romans. In 63 B.C. the town served as the headquarters of Catiline, the Roman statesman and conspirator. Of note in Fiesole are a well-preserved Roman theater (c.80 B.C.); the ruins of Roman baths; a Romanesque cathedral (11th cent.), with works by the sculptor Mino da Fiesole; and a Franciscan church and convent (on the site of the Roman acropolis). On the lower slopes of the hill is the Church of San Domenico di Fiesole, which has paintings by Fra Angelico.

Fiesole

a town in central Italy, in Tuscany near Florence: Etruscan and Roman remains. Pop.: 14 085 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
(46.) "In his edition of Minorbetri's description of the relics at Santa Maria del Fiore, Cionacci suggested that this relic was the episcopal ring of Zanobi Girolami, a bishop of Fiesole. Minorberri, 48.
The commune renewed laws prohibiting magnates (old noble Florentine families) from occupying the sees of Florence and Fiesole. Although the strict control of the clergy relaxed somewhat after the war, during the years of the Great Schism (1378-1417) and the Visconti wars, and until the end of the fifteenth century, the church continued to be subordinated to the state, and the clergy had to pay taxes to finance the needs of the Florentine government.
(66.) D'Estouteville projected himself into this miracle in a narrative relief carved by Mino da Fiesole in the 1460s.
Piero's of 1453 by Mino da Fiesole -- thought to be the first such bust -- was, as we gather from the evidence, placed above a doorway.
Sculptors like Antonio Rossellino, Mino da Fiesole, and Benedetto da Maiano, who have regularly been cited in prior discussions of the interaction of the arts, are given somewhat short shrift, but then this exhibition took as its point of departure the painting collections of the National Gallery, for which these artists had less importance.
Exemplary is the inventory of Fiesole by Raspini, 1962, and the work that has come out of it: AA.
[62] Cosimo donated books to the canons of Fiesole, the Minorites of del Bosco in the Mugello, and the brethren of San Bartolomeo.
And by the 1480s we find in Jacopo del Sellaio's Triumphs of Love, Chastity, Time and Eternity, now in the Museo Bandini in Fiesole [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 7 OMITTED], that the proto-theatrical trionfi depicted by Baldini have been transformed into true mascherate.