Fili

(redirected from Filid)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fili

 

a village near Moscow (now the Kiev Raion of Moscow), where on Sept. 1 (13), 1812, during the Patriotic War, M. I. Kutuzov convened a council of war to decide whether to defend or abandon Moscow. The council was attended by the generals M. B. Barclay de Tolly, L. L. Bennigsen, D. S. Dokhturov, A. P. Ermolov, P. P. Konovnitsyn, A. I. Osterman-Tolstoi, N. N. Raevskii, K. F. Tof, and F. S. Uvarov. After listening to the various opinions, Kutuzov, aware that the army had been weakened at the battle of Borodino (1812) and that the position taken up by Bennigsen near Moscow had proved unfavorable, decided to withdraw from the city without giving battle. In his words, “the loss of Moscow does not mean the loss of Russia.” The withdrawal would enable the army to continue the war and to link up with approaching reserves. The hut of the peasant A. Frolov, in which the council was held, burned down in 1868 but was restored in 1887 and in 1962 became a branch of the Battle of Borodino Panorama and Museum.

Fili is also the site of an outstanding example of Russian architecture—the Pokrov Church (Church of the Intercession of the Virgin), built between 1690 and 1693 in the Naryshkin style. The circular church, of the type known as izhe pod kolokoly (“crowned by a belfry”), rests on an elevated terrace-like substructure with arcades and three staircases. Over the tetragonal base rise two tiers of octagonal prisms, diminishing in size, which terminate in an octagonal drum supporting a cupola. The base is surrounded by semicircular appurtenances, one of which serves as a sanctuary and the others serve as narthexes. The well-proportioned composition and magnificent white stone decoration add to the solemnity and splendor of the building.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Private entities and establishments are mandated to accept the FilID as a valid proof of identity of the individual, without requiring other or additional documents.
Chua said that under the bill, every Filipino, upon reaching the age of 18 and whether residing in the Philippines or abroad, is required to register personal data as required by the FilSys and upon application, shall be issued a non-transferable FilID.
Casual visitors to the Folger exhibition would have no grounds to imagine that before anyone set pen to paper in Anglo-Saxon, in Ireland was an advanced and literate Celtic Christian culture with scribes, monasteries, filid, bards, brehons, annalists, and poets.
Just as the filid and scop had to learn their art before the harp could be struck in the hall and tales told there, so as developing academics we need to learn the basic skills of formal writing, and then refine and hone these skills as a conscious strategy.
emphasizes the monks' passion for learning, even to the point of withholding obedience "if a bishop is ignorant" (118), a passion for learning she considers to be derived from Celtic pagan druids and filid (legal scholars).
According to Kathleen Hughes, Celtic oral tradition was transmitted by a learned class of men called filid, generally translated as "poets" or "seers" (166).
The tradition seems to be derived from the Gaelic filid (a class of professional poets), who composed savage tirades against persons who slighted them.
Responsibility for perpetuating these ancestries became part of the stock in trade of a learned class of men called filid, generally translated as "poets" or "seers" (K.
In a valuable new analysis of early Irish learned orders, he sees the key not in a mandarin class but in the interaction within a complex hereditary aristocracy of lords, churchmen, and ecclesiastical scholars working in Latin, and filid and brithemain whose medium was Irish.
Other riders include Danish jockey Sabina Gronback (Mlolshan), Germany's Eva Herresthal (Alhamdanieh), Hungary's (Edna Toth) Eljellabieh, USA's Filid Grant (Alkray), Australia's Manuela Slamanig (Alshuwaimeh).