filler

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filler

Entertainment something, such as a musical selection, to fill time in a broadcast or stage presentation

Filler

Any substance in paste form, used to fill cracks and imperfections in wood or marble.

Filler

 

a pasty substance used in painting and varnishing to produce a smooth surface before the surface coat is applied. In addition to film-forming materials, fillers contain extenders such as chalk, talc, and barite as well as pigments such as zinc white and ocher. Fillers may have a varnish, drying-oil, or natural-adhesive base. Since the content of film-forming materials in a filler is 5–12 times lower than that of pigment or extender, fillers do not provide for a sure adhesion of the covering coats to the surface. For this reason, a filler is usually applied over a layer of primer.

A thick filler is applied with a putty knife or a piece of rubber. A filler thinned with small amounts of solvent may be applied with a pneumatic spray gun. The thickness of a layer of filler may reach 300 μ; when a filler is used to fill holes or to seal a joint or a riveted or welded seam, however, several layers with a total thickness of up to 1 mm may be required. The dried-up layer of filler must be sanded well with an abrasive paper. Varnish-based fillers are used mainly in the machine-building industry; fillers with a natural-adhesive or drying-oil base are used primarily in the construction industry.

REFERENCE

Entsiklopediia polimerov, vol. 3. Moscow, 1977.

filler

[′fil·ər]
(computer science)
Storage space that does not contain significant data but is needed to comply with length requirements or is reserved to fulfill some future need.
(materials)
An inert material added to paper, resin, bituminous material, and other substances to modify their properties and improve quality.
A material used to fill holes in wood, plaster, or other surfaces before applying a coating such as paint or varnish.
(metallurgy)
The rod used to deposit metal in a joint in brazing, soldering, or welding. Also known as filler metal.

filler

1. A fine mineral aggregate used as an extender to improve the properties of coating asphalt and plastic asphalt cement.
2. Finely divided inert material (such as pulverized limestone, silica, or colloidal substances) sometimes added to portland cement paint or other materials to reduce shrinkage, improve workability, or act as an extender.
3. A pigmented paste, sometimes colored, rubbed into open-grained wood surfaces to fill the pores prior to finishing.
4. An inert material added to synthetic resin adhesives to improve their properties or reduce cost.
5. A plate which is inserted merely to fill up space; a filler plate.
6. In painting, a composition (often pigmented) used to fill pores or irregularities in a surface in preparation for the application of another coating.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seduced by the prospect of a relatively inexpensive solution to ageing, Jo is just one of 100,000 women a year who undergo injectables like Botox and fillers to plump up sagging faces and bodies, which up to now has been largely unregulated.
KG (Kempten, Germany) to market ESK's Boroneige functional fillers, cobranded with Merck KGaA's RonaFlair functional filler brand name.
Conclusion With increased use of dermal fillers, the complications are also being frequently encountered.
* Wood filler dries quickly, which is handy when you're in a hurry but makes getting it off your fingers a pain, so wash it off straight away or wear disposable gloves.
Prices start at pounds 2.78 for 500g powder Ronseal Smooth Finish Multi Purpose Filler. Find out more at www.ronseal.co.uk.
"We are harnessing the body's natural regenerative powers by extracting the patient's blood, and using it as a filler to plump up and heal tired and ageing skin," The New York Daily News quoted Dr.
RockTron products are naturally spherical, include no VOCs, and have lower melt viscosity and lower density than many other inorganic fillers. Glass microspheres (Mohs hardness scale = 5-6) enable low oil absorption, reducing the amount of polymer required.
The ash content (600[degrees]C) of the six fillers examined ranged from 1.1 to 15.0 percent, with the Asian furfural residue being the highest and the E.
The parts can achieve the same stiffness with a fraction of the filler. The parts can be as much as 20% lighter (in the case of the step-up, the weight reduction is 7.5 to 8%).
When the researchers performed the same test with a polymer containing a common filler, such as alumina or silicon carbide, the disks themselves sometimes withstood the test as well as those containing quasicrystals, but the steel balls became so worn that they could stand flat on a table.
Volumetric fillers typically have accuracies better than 1 percent of target volume, with 0.1 percent possible with some architectures.
They are available as castable liquids and in solid shapes suitable for machining, and as adhesives, fillers for surface repairs, seals and gaskets.