film theory

(redirected from Film studies)

film theory

[′film ‚thē·ə·rē]
(physics)
A theory of the transfer of material or heat across a phase boundary, where one or both of the phases are flowing fluids, the main controlling factor being resistance to heat conduction or mass diffusion through a relatively stagnant film of the fluid next to the surface. Also known as boundary-layer theory.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the discipline of animation studies has never developed a grand theory like the film studies discipline it budded from, films scholars here say, there are prevailing concepts and concerns that have emerged as fundamental to studying and understanding animation, and they are as diverse as the medium itself.
Critique: Amanda Konkle (Assistant Professor of Film Studies and English at Georgia Southern University's Armstrong Campus) presents Some Kind of Mirror: Creating Marilyn Monroe, a scholarly analysis of the film career of legendary actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962), exploring her on-screen personas in the context of discourses in the 1950's about the role of women.
The MoUs are for film appreciation course, organizing film festivals and exploring further opportunities of collaborations for film studies. Galgotias University has planned to explore the possibilities of starting the PG Program in Film Studies in collaboration with the Galgotias University, for which a team has already started working.
The Pitch Perfect 3 assignment was the first of many for Ellen who wants to undertake film studies at university.
Twelve years later, film studies has become an emerging field in the country, and the bibliography on Indonesian cinema has expanded.
Jean Ma addresses the neglect of sound in film studies through her history of the songstress, a dominant figure in Mandarin cinema from the 1930s until the 1960s who has been neglected in Chinese film history.
He was often called the father of film studies in Canada.
That said, there are a number of arguments that can be made in favour of this new Oxford Dictionary of Film Studies. I actually did put it to the test and used it for a range of different tasks that I frequently set for my students in film classes, such as finding definitions for a range of film styles and genres, which they can then apply to their analysis.
The importance of 1950s French film criticism in the establishment and consolidation of film studies as a recognized academic discipline in the decades that followed cannot be overestimated.