Filofei

Filofei

 

(secular surname Leshchinskii). Born 1650 in the Ukraine; died May 31 (June 11), 1727, in Tiumen’. Russian religious figure who spread Orthodoxy among the indigenous inhabitants of Siberia.

Filofei was sent to Tobol’sk as the Siberian metropolitan, a post he held from 1702 to 1709 and from 1717 to 1720. While Filofei employed harsh measures in disseminating Orthodoxy, his work was beneficial in that it helped educate the people. He equipped a mission to Mongolia in 1704 and one to Kamchatka in 1705. He opened several religious schools, where members of the minority peoples of Siberia studied together with Russians.


Filofei

 

Dates of birth and death unknown; died in Pskov. Russian writer and publicist of the first half of the 16th century. Monk at the Eleazar Monastery in Pskov.

Filofei was the author of epistles to Grand Prince Vasilii III, to Tsar Ivan IV, and to the d’iak M. G. Misiur’-Munekhin, the head of administration in Pskov after its incorporation into the Russian state. Filofei supported the principles of the Josephites in his writings. The theory of Moscow as the third Rome found its most consistent expression in his epistles. It affirmed the idea of the succession of Moscow and the Russian state to the leadership of the Orthodox Christian world after the loss of that leadership by Constantinople. Filofei favored the annexation of Pskov by Moscow.

References in periodicals archive ?
Strains of Filofei, Moscow as Third Rome, and chords of retuned Slavophilia all resound.
In the early sixteenth century, a Russian monk named Filofei of Pskov noted that the first two capitals of Christianity, Rome and Constantinople, had fallen to infidels, thereby leaving Moscow as the third and last defender of the faith.
13) About the same time, the Muscovite monk Filofei, reflecting on the destruction of all Orthodox kingdoms outside of Moscow, compared his country to the Woman Clothed in the Sun:
14) Filofei, "Poslanie o zlykh dnekh i chasekh," in Pamiatniki literatury drevnei Rusi: Konets XVpervaia polovina XVI veka, ed.
This pronouncement by Filofei [made in the fifteenth century] comes across to us from medieval times through tsarist Muscovy and autocratic Moscow.
Para comenzar podemos senalar el supuesto de que, por ejemplo, la herencia ideologica de Bizancio en Rusia se basaba en la famosa carta del monje Filofei (ca.
7) Russian Monastic Culture (hereafter, RMC), 85; Dykstra, however, may err in accepting some of Zimin's data, which might be checked and seen as speculative: for example, that Filofei Zvenigorodskii was Dionisii Zvenigorodskii's son (Zimin, Krupnaia feodal'naia vatchina, 114 n.
He rescues from obscurity such figures as Metropolitan Kirill (Filipp's successor), Bishop Filofei of Riazan', and Ol'ga, the daughter of Boris Godunov.