fining

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fining

[′fīn·iŋ]
(chemical engineering)
A process in which molten glass is cleared of bubbles, usually by the addition of chemical agents.
(food engineering)
A process for clarifying a beverage, such as beer or wine, by causing the suspended matter to fall to the bottom.
(materials)
A material such as gelatin, egg white, or bentonite that is used to clarify a liquid. Also known as clarifying agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because this natural settling is in most cases insufficient to achieve desired clarity, fining or filtration is often necessary prior to bottling.
Fining and filtration are both used for clarifying a wine as well as to "stabilize" a wine.
Common fining agents for white wines are milk, casein (the protein found in milk), and isinglass (derived from the air bladder of sturgeons).
Fining agents also are used to clarify a red wine to the point where only a light filtration or no filtration at all is needed prior to bottling.
The advantage of filtration over fining is that it can clarify a young, cloudy wine faster and more efficiently than fining.
To find a baseline, Motor Castings' management directed operators to measure the fining on a new installation and used that to help determine wear.
As with previous cases, metal was found behind the fining. The supplier determined metal penetration occurred at the seam between the spout and the fining.
Finally, during weekend repairs, observers took a closer look at the fining and spout separation.
Finings are used to clarify beer, by pulling yeast sediment to the bottom of the cask.
Although the finings drop to the bottom of the cask with the yeast and are not consumed, the use of an animal product to produce the beer is objected to by strict vegetarians and vegans.
Others use finings made from seaweed, but this is mostly confined to bottled beer usage.
Some pubs might specifically ask brewers to supply their real ales in an unfined state so that they can be served to customers who prefer to drink their real ale which has not been clarified by the use of finings.