sandpaper

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sandpaper,

abrasive originally made by gluing grains of sand to heavy paper sheets. Today sandpaper is made primarily with quartz, aluminum oxide, or silicon carbide grains, and is graded according to the size of the grains. It is used for smoothing and polishing, for removing old paint or varnish, and for otherwise preparing wood surfaces for refinishing or other treatment.
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Sandpaper

An abrasive paper, made by coating a heavy paper with a fine sand or other abrasive held in place with glue; used for polishing surfaces and finished work.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

sandpaper

[′san‚pā·pər]
(materials)
Paper with abrasive glued to the surface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sandpaper

A tough paper which is coated with an abrasive material such as silica, garnet, silicon carbide, or aluminum oxide; used for smoothing and polishing; graded by a grit numbering system according to which the highest grit numbers (360 to 600) are used for fine polishing, and the lowest grit numbers (16 to 40) are used for coarse smoothing. Alternatively, sandpaper may be designated by the “0 grade” system, according to which “very fine” includes grades from 10/0 to 6/0, “fine” from 5/0 to 3/0, “medium” 2/0, 1/0, ½ “coarse” 1, 1½, and 2, “very coarse” 2½, 3, 3½, and 4.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sandpaper

1. (formerly) a strong paper coated with sand for smoothing and polishing
2. a common name for glasspaper
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005