fjord

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fjord

or

fiord

(fyôrd), steep-sided inlet of the sea characteristic of glaciated regions. Fjords probably resulted from the scouring by glaciers of valleys formed by any of several processes, including faulting and erosion by running water. When the regions occupied by these glaciers subsided, the valleys were drowned by the sea. The fjord coast lines of Norway, Scotland, Greenland, Alaska, British Columbia, S Chile, S New Zealand, and Antarctica are examples. A fjord differs from most estuaries in its sheer, parallel walls, often extending far below the water surface, and in its many branches of similar form. Often shallow at the mouth, fjords are frequently very deep farther inland. Sognafjord (Norway) is 4,000 ft (1,220 m) deep and over 100 mi (160 km) long. Loch Moran, Scotland (1,017 ft/310 m), is a typical fjord but is separated from the sea. Norwegian fjords are noted for their grandeur.

Fjord

 

a narrow, winding, deep inlet in a mountainous coast. Its length is often dozens of times greater than its width. The sides of fjords are steep, even vertical, becoming less steep in the upper walls; the floor is highly irregular. The longest known fjord, Sognafjorden, is 204 km long, 1.5–6 km wide, and up to 1,208 m deep. Fjords are often separated from the open sea by a sill. They represent ancient erosion or tectonic valleys that underwent scouring by mountain glaciers, which deepened the floor, and that were subsequently inundated by postglacial transgression. Fjords are found only at high latitudes where Pleistocene glaciers formed or modern glaciers exist; they are found on the coasts of Norway, Spitsbergen, Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Novaia Zemlia, Taimyr, the Chukchi Peninsula, New Zealand, and Patagonia.

fjord

[fyȯrd]
(geography)
A narrow, deep inlet of the sea between high cliffs or steep slopes. Also spelled fiord.

fjord

, fiord
(esp on the coast of Norway) a long narrow inlet of the sea between high steep cliffs formed by glacial action
References in periodicals archive ?
The spatial patterns found in this study fit well with patterns displayed by the same species and genera along fiords at similar latitudes (Michaelsen 2016a).
Les fiords ont ete survoles le long d'un simple transect situe dans le milieu.
Well, the Triple Crown is probably pining for the fiords.
And then the fog cleared and we caught sight of the other side, the upper coast of the South Island, a line of tree-strewn cliffs and small fiords and channels.
The report details the must-see and unique attractions of Oman - its mountains, fertile valleys, superb sandy beaches, fiords, a vibrant capital, exquisite Islamic architecture (including the jaw-dropping Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque in Muscat), an ancient and fascinating culture that remains largely intact, an array of budget and world-class hotels and some of the best souqs in Arabia.
Then Rome, Venice, Capri, London, Dublin, Zermatt, Paris, all those sweet little towns along the Rhine in Germany, Copenhagen, Stockholm, the fiords of Norway, Mexico, Rio, Canada, the beautiful islands of Hawaii.
They have already planned a boat trip along the fiords and a visit to a railway.
Written for tourists, the slim guide describes and interprets specific geological features found near Glacier Bay, Sitka, Chatham Strait, Juneau, Holkham Bay, Petersburg, and Misty Fiords.
Take an exciting wildlife and glacier cruise with Kenai Fiords Tours, Alaska's No.
Also, we have taken the preemptive move of removing Norway from the list of alternative nations, despite the lovely fiords, smoked fish, and free higher education.
There are fiords and rainforests, snowcapped mountains and volcanoes, pristine lakes and rivers.